Ghost
Portrait of Martha Arbeneva by Vladimir Borovikovsky, 1798 Russia

Portrait of Martha Arbeneva by Vladimir Borovikovsky, 1798 Russia

Portrait of Yekaterina Khruschova and Princess Yekaterina Khovanskaya by Dmitriy Levitsky, 1773 Russia, Russian Museum
At the time of this portrait, Khruschova was 12 and Khovanskaya was 11.

Portrait of Yekaterina Khruschova and Princess Yekaterina Khovanskaya by Dmitriy Levitsky, 1773 Russia, Russian Museum

At the time of this portrait, Khruschova was 12 and Khovanskaya was 11.

Portrait of Praskovia Kovalyova by Nikolai Argunov, 1803 Russia

Portrait of Praskovia Kovalyova by Nikolai Argunov, 1803 Russia

mimic-of-modes:

“Aussi brillante que Vénus la belle Dorine s’occupe … sa robe est à la Marlborough …” François Louis Joseph Watteau, Gallerie des Modes, 1785; engraving on paper
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 44.1619; The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection
The description “à la Marlborough” is relatively frequent in eighteenth century fashion, compared to the others shown in this series, but it is usually applied to hats.  According to Caroline Weber in Queen of Fashion, Marie Antoinette was obsessed with “Marlborough goes off to War,” a folk song that was sung to her son by his wet nurse, and “the Marlborough mode” was reflected across French fashion.  A gown could be striped à la Marlborough, and a certain style of large hat was also given the name.  It is difficult to define exactly what the term refers to in this fashion plate; the back seems to be somewhat unfitted, so perhaps it is something like a Lévite but with shorter sleeves.

I have a love-hate relationship with those giant late 18th century caps.

mimic-of-modes:

“Aussi brillante que Vénus la belle Dorine s’occupe … sa robe est à la Marlborough …” François Louis Joseph Watteau, Gallerie des Modes, 1785; engraving on paper

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 44.1619; The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection

The description “à la Marlborough” is relatively frequent in eighteenth century fashion, compared to the others shown in this series, but it is usually applied to hats.  According to Caroline Weber in Queen of Fashion, Marie Antoinette was obsessed with “Marlborough goes off to War,” a folk song that was sung to her son by his wet nurse, and “the Marlborough mode” was reflected across French fashion.  A gown could be striped à la Marlborough, and a certain style of large hat was also given the name.  It is difficult to define exactly what the term refers to in this fashion plate; the back seems to be somewhat unfitted, so perhaps it is something like a Lévite but with shorter sleeves.

I have a love-hate relationship with those giant late 18th century caps.

Wastepaper basket fancy dress, 1896 London, Fancy Dress Described
There’s such a thing as too much creativity.

Wastepaper basket fancy dress, 1896 London, Fancy Dress Described

There’s such a thing as too much creativity.

Design by Renie to be worn by Mitzi Gaynor in The I Don’t Care Girl, 1953

Design by Renie to be worn by Mitzi Gaynor in The I Don’t Care Girl, 1953

"Queen of Sheba" by Mon Pascaud, 1926 France, LACMA

"Queen of Sheba" by Mon Pascaud, 1926 France, LACMA

"Prince of Persia" by Mon Pascaud, 1926 France, LACMA

"Prince of Persia" by Mon Pascaud, 1926 France, LACMA

"Maharaj of India" by Mon Pascaud, 1926 France, LACMA
"Young Princess of Lotusland", 1926 France, LACMA

"Young Princess of Lotusland", 1926 France, LACMA

"A Lady of Hindoostan", 1800’s-1810’s London
Hindoostan or Hindustan are alternative names for India, particularly northern India.

"A Lady of Hindoostan", 1800’s-1810’s London

Hindoostan or Hindustan are alternative names for India, particularly northern India.

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