Ghost
Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon
Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

Madame Élisabeth de France (1764–1794) by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, ca 1787 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Madame Élisabeth de France (1764–1794) by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, ca 1787 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Princess Élisabeth of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, ca 1782 France, Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon
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Princess Élisabeth of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, ca 1782 France, Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

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Caroline Ferdinanda Luise of Naples and Sicily by François Gérard, 1820-37 (ca early 1820’s) France, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

Caroline Ferdinanda Luise of Naples and Sicily by François Gérard, 1820-37 (ca early 1820’s) France, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

A Treat for her Pet by Guillaume Dubufe, 1871 France, private collection
I really want a bird but I’ll never have one because I’ll always have a cat. :(

A Treat for her Pet by Guillaume Dubufe, 1871 France, private collection

I really want a bird but I’ll never have one because I’ll always have a cat. :(

Louise, Duchess of Devonshire’s ‘Queen of Zenobia’ Ball Gown for the Devonshire House Ball by House of Worth, 1897 Paris (worn in England), Chatsworth


Ball gown with an under-robe of cloth of silver, wrought all over with silver thread and brilliants, and with an over-dress of green and gold shot-silk gauze, embroidered to the waist with green and gold metalwork, decorated with jewels. A long train of turquoise velvet, embroidered in gold to an oriental design, was attached to the shoulders. A bodice of gold cloth and lace was fitted over a whalebone corset into which her waist was tightly laced. The headdress that went with it has not survived, but it can be seen in Lafayette’s photograph.
The dress was made for Louise, Duchess of Devonshire by the House of Worth to wear at the celebrated Diamond Jubilee Ball at Devonshire House. It was a fancy dress ball and Louise attended as Queen Zenobia, the warrior Queen of Palmyra. The Duchess may have got the idea for the theme of the dress from Inigo Jones’s costume designs for Court Masques that are in the drawing collections at Chatsworth.

Unfortunately, the images are really small.

Louise, Duchess of Devonshire’s ‘Queen of Zenobia’ Ball Gown for the Devonshire House Ball by House of Worth, 1897 Paris (worn in England), Chatsworth

Ball gown with an under-robe of cloth of silver, wrought all over with silver thread and brilliants, and with an over-dress of green and gold shot-silk gauze, embroidered to the waist with green and gold metalwork, decorated with jewels. A long train of turquoise velvet, embroidered in gold to an oriental design, was attached to the shoulders. A bodice of gold cloth and lace was fitted over a whalebone corset into which her waist was tightly laced. The headdress that went with it has not survived, but it can be seen in Lafayette’s photograph.

The dress was made for Louise, Duchess of Devonshire by the House of Worth to wear at the celebrated Diamond Jubilee Ball at Devonshire House. It was a fancy dress ball and Louise attended as Queen Zenobia, the warrior Queen of Palmyra. The Duchess may have got the idea for the theme of the dress from Inigo Jones’s costume designs for Court Masques that are in the drawing collections at Chatsworth.

Unfortunately, the images are really small.

La Soirée by Jean Béraud, ca 1880 France, Musée Carnavalet

La Soirée by Jean Béraud, ca 1880 France, Musée Carnavalet

Deborah, Dowager Duchess of Devonshire’s Peeress’s Robes, worn at the Coronation of H.M. The Queen in 1953, possibly late 18th century with later alterations, Chatsworth


Cecil Beaton called Deborah ‘the most beautiful of all’ the peeresses in this off-the-shoulder robe, believed to have been reworked from an original worn by Georgiana, wife of the 5th Duke of Devonshire. In her memoirs, Deborah describes how she came to wear it:
"…Moucher [Mary Devonshire] was to have the robes that had been carefully put away by Granny Evie in 1937 after King George VI’s coronation. Chatsworth, as always, came to the rescue. There were a number of tin boxes…In the vain hope of finding something for me, we started going through them and, lo and behold, from beneath a ton of tissue paper in the box that had held Moucher’s, appeared a second crimson peeress’s robe. The velvet is of exceptional quality, so soft your fingers hardly know they’re touching it, and of such pure brilliant crimson as to make you blink." Deborah Devonshire, Wait for me! (John Murray, 2010)

Deborah, Dowager Duchess of Devonshire’s Peeress’s Robes, worn at the Coronation of H.M. The Queen in 1953, possibly late 18th century with later alterations, Chatsworth

Cecil Beaton called Deborah ‘the most beautiful of all’ the peeresses in this off-the-shoulder robe, believed to have been reworked from an original worn by Georgiana, wife of the 5th Duke of Devonshire. In her memoirs, Deborah describes how she came to wear it:

"…Moucher [Mary Devonshire] was to have the robes that had been carefully put away by Granny Evie in 1937 after King George VI’s coronation. Chatsworth, as always, came to the rescue. There were a number of tin boxes…In the vain hope of finding something for me, we started going through them and, lo and behold, from beneath a ton of tissue paper in the box that had held Moucher’s, appeared a second crimson peeress’s robe. The velvet is of exceptional quality, so soft your fingers hardly know they’re touching it, and of such pure brilliant crimson as to make you blink."
Deborah Devonshire, Wait for me! (John Murray, 2010)

Ad for McCall Quarterly by Irving Nurick, 1928 (UK publication)

Ad for McCall Quarterly by Irving Nurick, 1928 (UK publication)

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

(Left to right) Mrs. Watson B. Thompson, John Sloan Jr., Mrs. John Sloane, Mr. John Sloane, Evelyn Sloane, William Sloane, Mina Barber, Mary Butter, 1884 US (Elberon, NJ), the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(Left to right) Mrs. Watson B. Thompson, John Sloan Jr., Mrs. John Sloane, Mr. John Sloane, Evelyn Sloane, William Sloane, Mina Barber, Mary Butter, 1884 US (Elberon, NJ), the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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