Ghost
Portrait of Elisabeth Henriette Bruun de Neergaard with her eldest son Henrik by Jens Juel, 1799-1800 Denmark, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
The Athenaeum gives the artist as George William Joy, but this can’t be right because he was born in 1844 - long after this painting was made.  I can’t find the painting in the museum’s collections to find out where the confusion comes from.

Portrait of Elisabeth Henriette Bruun de Neergaard with her eldest son Henrik by Jens Juel, 1799-1800 Denmark, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

The Athenaeum gives the artist as George William Joy, but this can’t be right because he was born in 1844 - long after this painting was made.  I can’t find the painting in the museum’s collections to find out where the confusion comes from.

Mädchen vor dem Lottogewölbe by Peter Fendi, 1829 Vienna, the Belvedere
The title means something like “girl in front of the lottery vault”.

Mädchen vor dem Lottogewölbe by Peter Fendi, 1829 Vienna, the Belvedere

The title means something like “girl in front of the lottery vault”.

brsis:

oldrags:

Mary McCall by Robert Feke, ca 1746 US (Philadelphia), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Feke is considered the first important American-born artist.  He developed a style that was distinct from the prevalent English technique practiced in the Colonies.  This “native style” became popular, and Feke earned a living as an itinerant portraitist, traveling between Boston, Philadelphia, and Newport, Rhode Island.  Little is known of Feke; his later life is particularly mysterious.  After embarking from Newport in 1750, possibly bound for commissions in Barbados, he was never heard from again.  Mary McCall was a member of the Philadelphia Dancing Assembly, which hosted dances every two weeks and was a vital part of the social life of colonial Philadelphia.  She holds a single flower, a common device in Feke’s portraits, in this case possibly indicating McCall’s availability for marriage.  Seven years after this portrait was thought to have been painted, McCall married the merchant William Plumstead, whoserved as mayor of Philadelphia in the mid-1750’s.


what is even up with that dress
no, really - i mean i know it’s a painting and he’s not exactly winterhalter, but the cuffs look pretty good and there’s a shadow of the shoulder piece seam and that slight bagging you get under the arm if you don’t get your scye spot-on (don’t even talk to me about 18th century sleeve heads) but there’s no waist seam (even if we assume it’s under the waist cord, there’s nothing on the peach either), no robings, and it has a closed front (in 1746?), and she has buttons on a gown? i mean it could be a redingote but it doesn’t have a collar either. and whatever’s going on underneath doesn’t look like a gown and a stomacher, but what else could it be?
weirdly in fashion history people don’t talk about america an awful lot until hollywood really kicks off, so it’s actually not that unusual to have american garments turning up that look nothing like anything anybody recognises, but still

I’d be really interested in learning about unique fashion trends in early/colonial America.  I know that relatively poor, isolated communities like the one my NC ancestors lived in came up with some interesting things you wouldn’t find in a fashion magazine.  There’s a picture I have from ca 1880 of my great-great-grandma wearing an oddly modern-looking summer scarf.

brsis:

oldrags:

Mary McCall by Robert Feke, ca 1746 US (Philadelphia), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Feke is considered the first important American-born artist.  He developed a style that was distinct from the prevalent English technique practiced in the Colonies.  This “native style” became popular, and Feke earned a living as an itinerant portraitist, traveling between Boston, Philadelphia, and Newport, Rhode Island.  Little is known of Feke; his later life is particularly mysterious.  After embarking from Newport in 1750, possibly bound for commissions in Barbados, he was never heard from again.

Mary McCall was a member of the Philadelphia Dancing Assembly, which hosted dances every two weeks and was a vital part of the social life of colonial Philadelphia.  She holds a single flower, a common device in Feke’s portraits, in this case possibly indicating McCall’s availability for marriage.  Seven years after this portrait was thought to have been painted, McCall married the merchant William Plumstead, whoserved as mayor of Philadelphia in the mid-1750’s.

what is even up with that dress

no, really - i mean i know it’s a painting and he’s not exactly winterhalter, but the cuffs look pretty good and there’s a shadow of the shoulder piece seam and that slight bagging you get under the arm if you don’t get your scye spot-on (don’t even talk to me about 18th century sleeve heads) but there’s no waist seam (even if we assume it’s under the waist cord, there’s nothing on the peach either), no robings, and it has a closed front (in 1746?), and she has buttons on a gown? i mean it could be a redingote but it doesn’t have a collar either. and whatever’s going on underneath doesn’t look like a gown and a stomacher, but what else could it be?

weirdly in fashion history people don’t talk about america an awful lot until hollywood really kicks off, so it’s actually not that unusual to have american garments turning up that look nothing like anything anybody recognises, but still

I’d be really interested in learning about unique fashion trends in early/colonial America.  I know that relatively poor, isolated communities like the one my NC ancestors lived in came up with some interesting things you wouldn’t find in a fashion magazine.  There’s a picture I have from ca 1880 of my great-great-grandma wearing an oddly modern-looking summer scarf.

Mrs Elizabeth Wurtz Elder and Her Three Children by Jacob Eichholtz, 1825 US (Philadelphia?), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
I can’t get over how cute that fur bonnet is.  I’m just going to pretend that it’s faux fur, even though it didn’t exist yet.

Mrs Elizabeth Wurtz Elder and Her Three Children by Jacob Eichholtz, 1825 US (Philadelphia?), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

I can’t get over how cute that fur bonnet is.  I’m just going to pretend that it’s faux fur, even though it didn’t exist yet.

Mary McCall by Robert Feke, ca 1746 US (Philadelphia), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Feke is considered the first important American-born artist.  He developed a style that was distinct from the prevalent English technique practiced in the Colonies.  This “native style” became popular, and Feke earned a living as an itinerant portraitist, traveling between Boston, Philadelphia, and Newport, Rhode Island.  Little is known of Feke; his later life is particularly mysterious.  After embarking from Newport in 1750, possibly bound for commissions in Barbados, he was never heard from again.  Mary McCall was a member of the Philadelphia Dancing Assembly, which hosted dances every two weeks and was a vital part of the social life of colonial Philadelphia.  She holds a single flower, a common device in Feke’s portraits, in this case possibly indicating McCall’s availability for marriage.  Seven years after this portrait was thought to have been painted, McCall married the merchant William Plumstead, whoserved as mayor of Philadelphia in the mid-1750’s.

Mary McCall by Robert Feke, ca 1746 US (Philadelphia), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Feke is considered the first important American-born artist.  He developed a style that was distinct from the prevalent English technique practiced in the Colonies.  This “native style” became popular, and Feke earned a living as an itinerant portraitist, traveling between Boston, Philadelphia, and Newport, Rhode Island.  Little is known of Feke; his later life is particularly mysterious.  After embarking from Newport in 1750, possibly bound for commissions in Barbados, he was never heard from again.

Mary McCall was a member of the Philadelphia Dancing Assembly, which hosted dances every two weeks and was a vital part of the social life of colonial Philadelphia.  She holds a single flower, a common device in Feke’s portraits, in this case possibly indicating McCall’s availability for marriage.  Seven years after this portrait was thought to have been painted, McCall married the merchant William Plumstead, whoserved as mayor of Philadelphia in the mid-1750’s.

Baroness Matilde Guiguer de Prangins in her Park at the Lake of Geneva by Jens Juel, 1779, Statens Museum for Kunst
Giant image

Baroness Matilde Guiguer de Prangins in her Park at the Lake of Geneva by Jens Juel, 1779, Statens Museum for Kunst

Giant image

hoodoothatvoodoo:

The perfect summer striped dress and red stiletto mules, 1957.
Photo by Roger Prigent

hoodoothatvoodoo:

The perfect summer striped dress and red stiletto mules, 1957.

Photo by Roger Prigent

Selina, Lady Skipwith by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1787 England, the Frick Collection
Giant image

Selina, Lady Skipwith by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1787 England, the Frick Collection

Giant image

Elizabeth, Countess of Warwick by Sir Joshua Reynolds, ca 1780 England, the Frick Collection
Giant image

Elizabeth, Countess of Warwick by Sir Joshua Reynolds, ca 1780 England, the Frick Collection

Giant image

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire with Her Infant Daughter Lady Georgiana Cavendish by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1783 England, the Devonshire Collection

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire with Her Infant Daughter Lady Georgiana Cavendish by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1783 England, the Devonshire Collection

 Lady Elizabeth Delmé and Her Children by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1777-79, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Lady Elizabeth Delmé and Her Children by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1777-79, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

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