Ghost
Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, attributed to William Larkin, 1613 England, Kenwood House
I just really like his shoes and stockings.

Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, attributed to William Larkin, 1613 England, Kenwood House

I just really like his shoes and stockings.

(Source: BBC)

Edward Sackville, later 4th Earl of Dorset, attributed to William Larkin, 1613 England, Kenwood House
William Larkin did brilliant texture work, especially on textiles, and his faces often had a near-photographic quality.  One thing he wasn’t so good at, however, was coming up with unique poses.  Many of his portraits are holding this exact pose.  The differences (besides the faces) might be in embroidery, the color/style of the clothing or little background details.  Sometimes the poses were flipped.  You’ll notice that the next picture I’m posting is almost identical to this one.

Edward Sackville, later 4th Earl of Dorset, attributed to William Larkin, 1613 England, Kenwood House

William Larkin did brilliant texture work, especially on textiles, and his faces often had a near-photographic quality.  One thing he wasn’t so good at, however, was coming up with unique poses.  Many of his portraits are holding this exact pose.  The differences (besides the faces) might be in embroidery, the color/style of the clothing or little background details.  Sometimes the poses were flipped.  You’ll notice that the next picture I’m posting is almost identical to this one.

(Source: BBC)

Three Young Girls by a follower of William Larkin, ca 1620 England, Berger Collection

These three unidentified sisters are dressed in matching outfits, a sort of family uniform, albeit an expensive and fashionable one. They wear the new taste for low necklines and high waists. Their scarlet damask dresses are exquisitely decorated with yellow-toned accessories and feature yellow-lace décolletage edgings, standing collars, and ruffs, as well as yellow braiding, silk ribbons, and bow belts; the girls wear matching yellow-lace hair bands. Yellow lace was introduced in around 1610 and remained in fashion for about ten years, helping to date the picture. The color coordination extends to the jewelry: two of the girls wear red and yellow coral bracelets, and all three have red coral hunting-horn earrings. The horn is a heraldic motif, suggesting that the girls come from an important landowning family. The sisters, with their fair skin and rosy cheeks, are a picture of beauty. Their gray-blue eyes are as jewellike as the diamonds of their gold three-drop pendants. Each girl’s hair—golden for the youngest, auburn for the middle, and tawny for the eldest—is brushed in the same style and contains an arrangement of fresh flowers representing symbols of spring, childhood, and fertility. The two youngest have marigolds set against a sea of blue hyacinths, with white antennaelike periwinkles; the eldest wears a red carnation and a white-feather plume. It is hoped that further research will help to identify these three young girls and also reveal the significance of the various objects that they are holding. Traditionally in art, ripe fruit has represented male and female fecundity. Taken with the doll of a grown-up woman held by the youngest child and the ring worn by the middle girl, the grapes and the pears may be symbols of the sisters’ future roles as mothers and wives.

Three Young Girls by a follower of William Larkin, ca 1620 England, Berger Collection

These three unidentified sisters are dressed in matching outfits, a sort of family uniform, albeit an expensive and fashionable one. They wear the new taste for low necklines and high waists. Their scarlet damask dresses are exquisitely decorated with yellow-toned accessories and feature yellow-lace décolletage edgings, standing collars, and ruffs, as well as yellow braiding, silk ribbons, and bow belts; the girls wear matching yellow-lace hair bands. Yellow lace was introduced in around 1610 and remained in fashion for about ten years, helping to date the picture. The color coordination extends to the jewelry: two of the girls wear red and yellow coral bracelets, and all three have red coral hunting-horn earrings. The horn is a heraldic motif, suggesting that the girls come from an important landowning family.

The sisters, with their fair skin and rosy cheeks, are a picture of beauty. Their gray-blue eyes are as jewellike as the diamonds of their gold three-drop pendants. Each girl’s hair—golden for the youngest, auburn for the middle, and tawny for the eldest—is brushed in the same style and contains an arrangement of fresh flowers representing symbols of spring, childhood, and fertility. The two youngest have marigolds set against a sea of blue hyacinths, with white antennaelike periwinkles; the eldest wears a red carnation and a white-feather plume.

It is hoped that further research will help to identify these three young girls and also reveal the significance of the various objects that they are holding. Traditionally in art, ripe fruit has represented male and female fecundity. Taken with the doll of a grown-up woman held by the youngest child and the ring worn by the middle girl, the grapes and the pears may be symbols of the sisters’ future roles as mothers and wives.

Hélène Fourment in Her Bridal Gown by Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1630 (Belgium?), Alte Pinakothek
Rubens married Hélène Fourment in 1630, four years after the death of his first wife.  Hélène was 16 and he was 53.

Hélène Fourment in Her Bridal Gown by Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1630 (Belgium?), Alte Pinakothek

Rubens married Hélène Fourment in 1630, four years after the death of his first wife.  Hélène was 16 and he was 53.

Self-portrait of the Artist with his Wife Suzanne Cock and their Children by Cornelis de Vos, 1630’s the Netherlands, the State Hermitage Museum

Self-portrait of the Artist with his Wife Suzanne Cock and their Children by Cornelis de Vos, 1630’s the Netherlands, the State Hermitage Museum

(Source: hermitagemuseum.org)

Magdalena (geb. 1618) und Jan-Baptiste de Vos (geb. 1619), die Kinder des Malers by Cornelis de Vos, 1621-22, Gemäldegalerie

Magdalena (geb. 1618) und Jan-Baptiste de Vos (geb. 1619), die Kinder des Malers by Cornelis de Vos, 1621-22, Gemäldegalerie

(Source: smb-digital.de)

Portrait of Marie-Louise de Tassis by Anthony van Dyck, ca 1630, Fürstlich Lichtensteinische Gemäldegalerie
Click for a giant image.

Portrait of Marie-Louise de Tassis by Anthony van Dyck, ca 1630, Fürstlich Lichtensteinische Gemäldegalerie

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(Source: liechtensteincollections.at)

Portrait of a Lady by Thomas de Keyser, 1632 the Netherlands, Gemäldegalerie
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Portrait of a Lady by Thomas de Keyser, 1632 the Netherlands, Gemäldegalerie

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Isabel de Borbón by Diego Velázquez, 1632 Spain, private collection (NYC)

Isabel de Borbón by Diego Velázquez, 1632 Spain, private collection (NYC)

(Source: wga.hu)

Portrait of Camilla Spinola by Carlo Ceresa, ca 1633 Italy, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg
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Portrait of Camilla Spinola by Carlo Ceresa, ca 1633 Italy, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg

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Mariana of Austria as Holy Roman Empress by Franz Luycx, 1631

Mariana of Austria as Holy Roman Empress by Franz Luycx, 1631

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