Ghost
I just discovered your blog and I LOVE it. I'm such a fashion junkie, both contemporary and historical <3 May I ask you at which age you became interested in fashion history? clearloid

Oh wow uhh…I actually don’t know. lol I think I was about 16?

Sorry I haven’t been posting.  I’ve been working on a paper about Hieronymus Bosch’s Temptation of St Anthony in Lisbon vs St Anthony’s life and veneration.  None of my sentences sound good because I have to say St Anthony all the time.

is there any dress i could buy for $25 Anonymous
OK. Hi. So, I looove your blog. And your DeviantArt. And your other blog. If we want to be honest, I've been sorta kinda respectfully stalking your blog. So, I thought I should stop by and say hey, since you're so awesome, and we live in the same state, and you're going to the same college as my aunt, and all that jazz. And, this post sounds really weird. Um. But, yeah. So, just keep it up! :D *insert failed attempt at resolving awkwardness* flowersforophelia

Actually no I’m extremely flattered! ); Does your aunt still go to UNCC?  Where do you live in North Carolina?

ALSO I SEE FROM YOUR BLOG THAT YOU LIKE SILENT MOVIES SO THAT MAKES YOU INSTANTLY MY BEST FRIEND

1901-a-space-odyssey:

The Delineator, April 1899.

Bicycle suits and a hat ad
fleurdulys:

The Bird Catchers - Francois Boucher
1748

fleurdulys:

The Bird Catchers - Francois Boucher

1748

tender-isthe-night:

Vogue, March 1915, Helen Dryden.

Love it
I am writing some historical fiction set in the 1790s and I have some questions: How would young women have worn their hair? What would they have worn riding? How would they have kept warm? (i.e. cloaks, jackets, shawls, etc) Thanks Anonymous
Afternoon dress, ca 1785 England, the Victoria &amp; Albert Museum

In the 1770s and 1780s printed cotton fabrics began to replace silk in popularity for women’s gowns. The material of this gown has a dotted ground and is printed in a repeating pattern of floral sprays. The gown has a fitted back and open front below the waist, revealing a petticoat of the same fabric. The lack of decoration and use of cotton instead of silk indicates that this gown was probably worn during summer afternoons for card games and tea parties, rather than for evening dress.

Afternoon dress, ca 1785 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

In the 1770s and 1780s printed cotton fabrics began to replace silk in popularity for women’s gowns. The material of this gown has a dotted ground and is printed in a repeating pattern of floral sprays. The gown has a fitted back and open front below the waist, revealing a petticoat of the same fabric. The lack of decoration and use of cotton instead of silk indicates that this gown was probably worn during summer afternoons for card games and tea parties, rather than for evening dress.

Robe, ca 1797 England, the Victoria &amp; Albert Museum

Cashmere shawls were prized imports from India during the late 18th century. British manufacturers soon began making shawls in similar styles. Not only were they worn with the newly fashionable Neo-classical gowns, the shawls were also made into gowns. In this example of the late 1790s, the shawl was cut in half and then sewn together to form the front and back of the gown. Sleeves of cream satin and a collar and over-sleeves of green silk fabric were then added. The waistline is very high, sitting just below the bust line.

Robe, ca 1797 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Cashmere shawls were prized imports from India during the late 18th century. British manufacturers soon began making shawls in similar styles. Not only were they worn with the newly fashionable Neo-classical gowns, the shawls were also made into gowns. In this example of the late 1790s, the shawl was cut in half and then sewn together to form the front and back of the gown. Sleeves of cream satin and a collar and over-sleeves of green silk fabric were then added. The waistline is very high, sitting just below the bust line.

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