Ghost Ghost
A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
The wedding dress described on this page is here.
Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.
A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.
A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.
Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.
The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.
Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.
To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".
I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

The wedding dress described on this page is here.

Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.

A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.

A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.

Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.

The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.

Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.

To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".

I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

  1. mayregnard reblogged this from oldrags
  2. always-overwhelmed reblogged this from oldrags
  3. mygoodrabbit reblogged this from oldrags
  4. bittersweetstyle reblogged this from honeyed
  5. ladymillicent reblogged this from honeyed
  6. honeyed reblogged this from oldrags
  7. acostumer reblogged this from oldrags
  8. tumblchorraden reblogged this from oldrags and added:
    I like the braided hairdo
  9. awesomethingsaregoodforyou reblogged this from oldrags
  10. spookyjesusandthejerk reblogged this from psychedelicatessen
  11. thealtruisticnarcissist reblogged this from oldrags

Button Theme