Ghost Ghost
A “Worth Knowing” column and various ads, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Not all of these are clothing-related, but it’s very interesting:

Worth Knowing
Veils are not so much worn as formerly.
R. S. V. P. is never put on invitations nowadays.  It is considered countrified.
Bridesmaids’ fans are made in the shape of hearts, have long handles, and are covered with flowers.
Piano-back decoration is now a thing of the past.  The backs of pianos are now left without painting or ornamentation of any kind.
It is wise to give all clothing and bedding, when first brought out for use, a thorough airing.  They should be placed in the yard, and well shaken to remove all impurities.
The pretty custom of leaving a bunch of flowers with a card when calling is still fashionable.  The bunch is small, and the flowers contain some suitable sentiment.
Several inquiries have reached us lately as to the most appropriate dress to be worn at confirmations.  The more simple they are in style the better.  The whole toilet should be white, not necessarily shoes, which are sometimes bronze, sometimes black, but as often either white kid or satin.  The choice of material for confirmation dresses lies between white Indian muslin, book muslin made up over silk, white nainsook, white surah, nun’s-cloth, alpaca, cashmere and soft washing silk.  The more plainly these can be made the better.  Trimmings of almost any kind are not considered appropriate; no lace is used, no fringes, no beads, merely a large ribbon sash.  The arrangement of the skirt consists mostly of three box-pleats or three kilt pleats, a drapery above this finishing at the side, and bouffant round the waist, and, in nine cases out of ten, the bodice is made plain and full, with a band.  Plain waterfall skirts, that is, the material simply hemmed and made very full at the waist, with no further adornment, but some looped bows at the sides, is a style of making to be recommended for any soft woolen stuff.  Veils are not nearly so much worn as caps, made of the clearest tulle, hemmed, and a point falling over the face to the waist.  Either silk, kid, or Suede gloves complete the dress.

A “Worth Knowing” column and various ads, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Not all of these are clothing-related, but it’s very interesting:

Worth Knowing

Veils are not so much worn as formerly.

R. S. V. P. is never put on invitations nowadays.  It is considered countrified.

Bridesmaids’ fans are made in the shape of hearts, have long handles, and are covered with flowers.

Piano-back decoration is now a thing of the past.  The backs of pianos are now left without painting or ornamentation of any kind.

It is wise to give all clothing and bedding, when first brought out for use, a thorough airing.  They should be placed in the yard, and well shaken to remove all impurities.

The pretty custom of leaving a bunch of flowers with a card when calling is still fashionable.  The bunch is small, and the flowers contain some suitable sentiment.

Several inquiries have reached us lately as to the most appropriate dress to be worn at confirmations.  The more simple they are in style the better.  The whole toilet should be white, not necessarily shoes, which are sometimes bronze, sometimes black, but as often either white kid or satin.  The choice of material for confirmation dresses lies between white Indian muslin, book muslin made up over silk, white nainsook, white surah, nun’s-cloth, alpaca, cashmere and soft washing silk.  The more plainly these can be made the better.  Trimmings of almost any kind are not considered appropriate; no lace is used, no fringes, no beads, merely a large ribbon sash.  The arrangement of the skirt consists mostly of three box-pleats or three kilt pleats, a drapery above this finishing at the side, and bouffant round the waist, and, in nine cases out of ten, the bodice is made plain and full, with a band.  Plain waterfall skirts, that is, the material simply hemmed and made very full at the waist, with no further adornment, but some looped bows at the sides, is a style of making to be recommended for any soft woolen stuff.  Veils are not nearly so much worn as caps, made of the clearest tulle, hemmed, and a point falling over the face to the waist.  Either silk, kid, or Suede gloves complete the dress.

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    certainly very interesting for reenactors
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