Ghost
Portrait of a Young Woman by Lorenzo di Credi, 1490’s Florence, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This damaged but evocative portrait has been identified as the widow of Credi’s brother, who was a goldsmith. This would explain why she is dressed in black and holds a ring. The juniper bush (ginepro) behind her could refer to her name, Ginevra di Giovanni di Niccolò. The picture was inspired by Leonardo’s portrait of Ginevra de’ Benci in the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Portrait of a Young Woman by Lorenzo di Credi, 1490’s Florence, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This damaged but evocative portrait has been identified as the widow of Credi’s brother, who was a goldsmith. This would explain why she is dressed in black and holds a ring. The juniper bush (ginepro) behind her could refer to her name, Ginevra di Giovanni di Niccolò. The picture was inspired by Leonardo’s portrait of Ginevra de’ Benci in the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Beatrice d’Este by Bartolomeo Veneto, ca 1500 Italy, Snite Museum of Art (University of Notre Dame)
According to Gogm: “[Beatrice d’Este] lived from 1475-1497 so this is either a posthumous portrait or the circa 1500 in the date needs to be taken seriously.”

Beatrice d’Este by Bartolomeo Veneto, ca 1500 Italy, Snite Museum of Art (University of Notre Dame)

According to Gogm: “[Beatrice d’Este] lived from 1475-1497 so this is either a posthumous portrait or the circa 1500 in the date needs to be taken seriously.”

Portrait of Kunigunde of Austria by unknown master, ca 1485 Austria, Fundación Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza
There’s little naked people on her headpiece.

Portrait of Kunigunde of Austria by unknown master, ca 1485 Austria, Fundación Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza

There’s little naked people on her headpiece.

(Source: museothyssen.org)

Profile Portrait of a Young Lady by Antonio del Pollaiuolo, 1465 Italy, Gemäldegalerie
Click for a huge image.

Profile Portrait of a Young Lady by Antonio del Pollaiuolo, 1465 Italy, Gemäldegalerie

Click for a huge image.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Saints Catherine and Mary Magdalene by Konrad Witz, ca 1440 Germany or Switzerland, Musée des Beaux-Arts (Strasbourg)

Saints Catherine and Mary Magdalene by Konrad Witz, ca 1440 Germany or Switzerland, Musée des Beaux-Arts (Strasbourg)

Saint Eligius as a Goldsmith by Petrus Christus, 1449 the Netherlands, the Met Museum
The standing man and woman are buying a wedding ring, which is being weighed in that little scale.  To the left of Saint Eligius (or the goldsmith - there’s controversy as to who it represents) is a convex mirror showing the road outside his shop.  Seen in this mirror are two foppish men, one who is holding a falcon.

Saint Eligius as a Goldsmith by Petrus Christus, 1449 the Netherlands, the Met Museum

The standing man and woman are buying a wedding ring, which is being weighed in that little scale.  To the left of Saint Eligius (or the goldsmith - there’s controversy as to who it represents) is a convex mirror showing the road outside his shop.  Seen in this mirror are two foppish men, one who is holding a falcon.

The Betrothal by unknown, ca 1470 Italy, Gemäldegalerie

The Betrothal by unknown, ca 1470 Italy, Gemäldegalerie

Detail of The Visitation by Giovanna Tornabuoni, ca 1488 Florence, Santa Maria Novella Church, Florence

Detail of The Visitation by Giovanna Tornabuoni, ca 1488 Florence, Santa Maria Novella Church, Florence

Detail of the Braque Family Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden, ca 1450, the Louvre

Detail of the Braque Family Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden, ca 1450, the Louvre

Penthesilea as one of the Nine Female Worthies by anonymous, 1460’s France, Bibliothèque nationale de France
In the Middle Ages, the Nine Worthies were nine historic, scriptural and legendary men who personified the virtue of chivalry.  They included the three good pagans (Hector, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar), the three good Jews (Joshua, David, Judas Maccabeus), and the three good Christians (King Arthur, Charlemagne, Godfrey of Bouillon).  By the early Renaissance there were also female Worthies, but they weren’t always named and, when they were named, were not always the same people.  This particular illumination depicts Penthesilea, an Amazonian queen who fought for Troy during the Trojan War.  It was typical of the time to show people from history wearing contemporary clothing.

Penthesilea as one of the Nine Female Worthies by anonymous, 1460’s France, Bibliothèque nationale de France

In the Middle Ages, the Nine Worthies were nine historic, scriptural and legendary men who personified the virtue of chivalry.  They included the three good pagans (Hector, Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar), the three good Jews (Joshua, David, Judas Maccabeus), and the three good Christians (King Arthur, Charlemagne, Godfrey of Bouillon).  By the early Renaissance there were also female Worthies, but they weren’t always named and, when they were named, were not always the same people.  This particular illumination depicts Penthesilea, an Amazonian queen who fought for Troy during the Trojan War.  It was typical of the time to show people from history wearing contemporary clothing.

Baptism of Charles VII by anonymous, 15th century France
Depictions of children and babies from the 15th century and earlier are very rare.  This gown may or may not have been exclusively for baptism (I’m not sure how it was with royalty), but all other classes would have used the gowns afterwards as the baby’s Sunday best.

Baptism of Charles VII by anonymous, 15th century France

Depictions of children and babies from the 15th century and earlier are very rare.  This gown may or may not have been exclusively for baptism (I’m not sure how it was with royalty), but all other classes would have used the gowns afterwards as the baby’s Sunday best.

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