Ghost
Portrait of an Unknown Lady, Aged 31, Holding a Glove and a Fan in the style of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1609, Nostell Priory

Portrait of an Unknown Lady, Aged 31, Holding a Glove and a Fan in the style of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1609, Nostell Priory

(Source: BBC)

Lady Francis Fairfax by (or in the style of) Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1605-15, York Museums Trust

Lady Francis Fairfax by (or in the style of) Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1605-15, York Museums Trust

Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues by unknown, ca 1600 France

Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues by unknown, ca 1600 France

Portrait of a Young Lady by Federico Barocci, ca 1600, Statens Museum for Kunst
Larger image

Portrait of a Young Lady by Federico Barocci, ca 1600, Statens Museum for Kunst

Larger image

Kitchen interior with the parable of the rich man and the poor Lazarus, attributed to Pieter Cornelisz van Rijck, 1610’s the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

Kitchen interior with the parable of the rich man and the poor Lazarus, attributed to Pieter Cornelisz van Rijck, 1610’s the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

(Source: rijksmuseum.nl)

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Wedding of Maria de Medici and Henry IV of France by Jacopo Chimenti, 1600, Uffizi Gallery

Wedding of Maria de Medici and Henry IV of France by Jacopo Chimenti, 1600, Uffizi Gallery

Maria de Medici by Frans Pourbus the Younger, 1609-10 France, Rijksmueum

Maria de Medici by Frans Pourbus the Younger, 1609-10 France, Rijksmueum

Brigida Spinola Doria by Peter Paul Reubens, 1605 Italy, National Gallery of Art, Washington

Brigida Spinola Doria by Peter Paul Reubens, 1605 Italy, National Gallery of Art, Washington

Childrens dress, ca 1600 Germany, Lippisches Landesmuseum
Just when I think I’ve seen everything the distant past has left to offer, I get proven completely wrong.

Childrens dress, ca 1600 Germany, Lippisches Landesmuseum

Just when I think I’ve seen everything the distant past has left to offer, I get proven completely wrong.

Marchesa Geronima Spinola-Doria by Anthony van Dyck, early 17th century
My original comment about Dutch clothing on an Italian woman suddenly makes sense!
(Thanks thewidowflannigan)

Marchesa Geronima Spinola-Doria by Anthony van Dyck, early 17th century

My original comment about Dutch clothing on an Italian woman suddenly makes sense!

(Thanks thewidowflannigan)

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