Ghost

Mary and Elizabeth
Altar paining, Western Pomerania (Germany), around 1510
Thank you for the note! :)

Welcome!

Mary and Elizabeth

Altar paining, Western Pomerania (Germany), around 1510

Thank you for the note! :)

Welcome!

Portrait of Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont by François Clouet, ca 1570 France, MFA Houston
I’ve been wanting to post this for quite a while but I haven’t because I’ve been looking for a larger image.  There doesn’t seem to be one.

Portrait of Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont by François Clouet, ca 1570 France, MFA Houston

I’ve been wanting to post this for quite a while but I haven’t because I’ve been looking for a larger image.  There doesn’t seem to be one.

Some links, photos, fashion plates, polish outfit etc.


Hey, your blog is great, I love it and visit every day.

This thing, you called “Russian sleeves”, is actually “kontusz sleeves”. Since the end of XVI century it was  typical feature of polish national outfit. Just check what is “kontusz”.  It was very popular  in Commonwealth.  Kontusz also had its female version, very popular in XVIII century. See its pictures here:

 http://ubioryhistoryczne.blox.pl/html/1310721,262146,14,15.html?7,2010

I’ve found some nice web pages and I think you would enjoy watching it. 

These two focus on reconstruction of clothes from XII-XVIII century:

 http://www.nomina.pl/ubiory.html

 http://www.chantberry.com/rekonstrukcje.html

This page incudes fashion plates projected by Jan Matejko:

http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/polishcostumematejko14.htm

This one gives many information about Central and East Europe outfits:

 http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/PolArtCostumeWeapons.htm

This blog include great photos of polish ancient outfits:

 http://ubioryhistoryczne.blox.pl/html

This one includes pre-war photos, just click the years

 http://www.muzeummodyite.pl/kolekcja-wlasna/

This web page covers XIX and prewar men’s fashon but 2,4,6,7 unit includes women’s fashion. Some photos from XIX centures magazines, also fency outfits:

 http://www.buw.uw.edu.pl/wystawy/modameska/spis_tresci.html

This page is maybe the best, it shows photos of european princesses and aristocracy, sometimes in fency dresses:

 http://www.rvondeh.dircon.co.uk/

This web page covers whole history of fashion. Just click the links belove the writing: “HISTORIA UBIORU”. there are some of your photos:

 http://www.historiasztuki.com.pl/HISTORIA-UBIORU.html

 At the end you can see Teodora Matejko in her wedding dress in 1864 year. The dress was designed by her husband and stylized as polis national dress, basicly on kontusz. 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teodora_Matejko

I hope I haven’t borned you. If you are interested in more information just write to me. Bye. 

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Florentine Noblewoman by Bronzino?, 1540 Florence, San Diego Museum of Art

Florentine Noblewoman by Bronzino?, 1540 Florence, San Diego Museum of Art

Mary Queen of Scots by François Clouet, 1559-60 France, Royal Collection
White mourning was the deepest form of mourning in medieval times and in later years among the queens of France.  In the portrait, Mary Queen of Scots (who was once queen consort of France) wears white to mourn the death of King Francis II.

Mary Queen of Scots by François Clouet, 1559-60 France, Royal Collection

White mourning was the deepest form of mourning in medieval times and in later years among the queens of France.  In the portrait, Mary Queen of Scots (who was once queen consort of France) wears white to mourn the death of King Francis II.

Christina of Denmark, Duchess of Milan by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1538, National Gallery, London

Holbein painted this portrait of Christina of Denmark, the young widowed Duchess of Milan, for Henry VIII of England, who was considering her as a possible wife. Thomas Cromwell sent Holbein to Brussels, accompanied by Philip Hoby, to draw the duchess, and she sat for him for three hours. John Hutton, the English representative in Brussels, wrote of the result that “Mr Haunce … hathe shoid hym self to be the master of that siens [science], for it is very perffight”. Henry was so delighted with Christina’s portrait that, according to the imperial ambassador Eustace Chapuys, “since he saw it he has been in much better humour than he ever was, making musicians play on their instruments all day long”. Holbein painted Christina’s portrait in oils shortly afterwards, and the work has been recognised as one of his finest. In the event, Henry never secured the wary duchess as his wife. "If I had two heads," she said, "I would happily put one at the disposal of the King of England".

Bolded because that’s a great quote.

Christina of Denmark, Duchess of Milan by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1538, National Gallery, London

Holbein painted this portrait of Christina of Denmark, the young widowed Duchess of Milan, for Henry VIII of England, who was considering her as a possible wife. Thomas Cromwell sent Holbein to Brussels, accompanied by Philip Hoby, to draw the duchess, and she sat for him for three hours. John Hutton, the English representative in Brussels, wrote of the result that “Mr Haunce … hathe shoid hym self to be the master of that siens [science], for it is very perffight”. Henry was so delighted with Christina’s portrait that, according to the imperial ambassador Eustace Chapuys, “since he saw it he has been in much better humour than he ever was, making musicians play on their instruments all day long”. Holbein painted Christina’s portrait in oils shortly afterwards, and the work has been recognised as one of his finest. In the event, Henry never secured the wary duchess as his wife. "If I had two heads," she said, "I would happily put one at the disposal of the King of England".

Bolded because that’s a great quote.

Archduchess Eleanor of Austria by Jakob Seisenegger, 1536, Kunsthistorisches Museum
Eleanor would have been about two years old when this portrait was made.

Archduchess Eleanor of Austria by Jakob Seisenegger, 1536, Kunsthistorisches Museum

Eleanor would have been about two years old when this portrait was made.

Maria Christina of Austria by Jan Cornelisz Vermeyen, 1577, Kunsthistorisches Museum

Maria Christina of Austria by Jan Cornelisz Vermeyen, 1577, Kunsthistorisches Museum

Porträt einer vornehmen Dame by Lucas Cranach the Younger, 1564 Germany, Kunsthistorisches Museum

Porträt einer vornehmen Dame by Lucas Cranach the Younger, 1564 Germany, Kunsthistorisches Museum

Portrait of Christiana Eulenau by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1534 Germany
Click for a giant image

Portrait of Christiana Eulenau by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1534 Germany

Click for a giant image

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