Ghost
Brooch, 1754 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum


Hair had long been important in sentimental jewellery, but during the 18th century it took on a new prominence. It could now form the centrepiece of a jewel, arranged in complicated motifs or as plain, woven sections. Tiny fragments of hair could even be incorporated into delicate paintings. Some designs were made by professionals, but many women chose to work the hair of loved ones themselves, using gum to secure their creations.
Hair jewels were worn to cherish the living as well as to remember the dead. The survival of many pieces celebrating love and friendship indicate their great social importance

Brooch, 1754 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Hair had long been important in sentimental jewellery, but during the 18th century it took on a new prominence. It could now form the centrepiece of a jewel, arranged in complicated motifs or as plain, woven sections. Tiny fragments of hair could even be incorporated into delicate paintings. Some designs were made by professionals, but many women chose to work the hair of loved ones themselves, using gum to secure their creations.

Hair jewels were worn to cherish the living as well as to remember the dead. The survival of many pieces celebrating love and friendship indicate their great social importance

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

Portrait of Charlotte Beatrix Strick van Linschoten by Mattheus Verheyden, ca 1755 the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

Portrait of Charlotte Beatrix Strick van Linschoten by Mattheus Verheyden, ca 1755 the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

(Source: rijksmuseum.nl)

Princess Elizabeth of Saxe by Pietro Antonio Conte Rotari, ca 1755, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister
That’s a creative stomacher

Princess Elizabeth of Saxe by Pietro Antonio Conte Rotari, ca 1755, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

That’s a creative stomacher

La Prima Colazione by Jean-Étienne Liotard, 1754

La Prima Colazione by Jean-Étienne Liotard, 1754

Dress, ca 1755, Galleria del Costume

Button Theme