Ghost
This isn’t directly related to fashion history per se, but I thought that many of you would find it interesting.
Coming to us from the blog of the Royal Armouries is this painted iron mask from the 17th-18th centuries, displayed in the Tower of London.  Thought to be an executioner’s mask in the 19th century, the museum now believes that it is part of a “scold’s bridle” or “branks”, which were used to punish minor crimes such as gossip. (Meaning I’d probably be wearing one of these all the time.)

They usually consisted of a form of muzzle in a metal framework,  designed to effectively and painfully prevent the wearer from talking,  and shame them in public by making them conspicuous. The 18th-century  example shown here came from England or Scotland. It comprises an iron  frame for the head which was padlocked in place at the back, and a  serrated iron tongue for insertion into the mouth.



It is doubtful that branks were used at the Tower as instruments of  torture and punishment; it seems more likely that they were acquired to  augment and enhance the historic collection.

According to Wikipedia, the first recorded use of a scold’s bridle was in Scotland in 1567 but were also used in England, Germany and other places in Northern Europe.  They were usually used on lower class women who were gossipy, “riotous” or accused of witchcraft, but use on men was not unheard of.  Additional punishment came in the form of being forced to wear the bridle in public and, sometimes, beatings.
Some more examples of scold’s bridles:

16th century Scotland, Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

ca 1550-1800 Belgium, Wellcome Library, London
This example employs a bell to draw more attention to the wearer.

An illustration from ca 1649

This isn’t directly related to fashion history per se, but I thought that many of you would find it interesting.

Coming to us from the blog of the Royal Armouries is this painted iron mask from the 17th-18th centuries, displayed in the Tower of London.  Thought to be an executioner’s mask in the 19th century, the museum now believes that it is part of a “scold’s bridle” or “branks”, which were used to punish minor crimes such as gossip. (Meaning I’d probably be wearing one of these all the time.)

They usually consisted of a form of muzzle in a metal framework, designed to effectively and painfully prevent the wearer from talking, and shame them in public by making them conspicuous. The 18th-century example shown here came from England or Scotland. It comprises an iron frame for the head which was padlocked in place at the back, and a serrated iron tongue for insertion into the mouth.

It is doubtful that branks were used at the Tower as instruments of torture and punishment; it seems more likely that they were acquired to augment and enhance the historic collection.

According to Wikipedia, the first recorded use of a scold’s bridle was in Scotland in 1567 but were also used in England, Germany and other places in Northern Europe.  They were usually used on lower class women who were gossipy, “riotous” or accused of witchcraft, but use on men was not unheard of.  Additional punishment came in the form of being forced to wear the bridle in public and, sometimes, beatings.

Some more examples of scold’s bridles:

16th century Scotland, Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

ca 1550-1800 Belgium, Wellcome Library, London

This example employs a bell to draw more attention to the wearer.

An illustration from ca 1649

More from the Ball of 1903

Click thumbnails for identification

*I couldn’t fit her name on the line, but Czar Alexei’s wife was Maria Miloslavskaya.

Costumes worn to the Romanov Anniversary Ball in 1903.  The theme of the lavish masked ball was the reign of Alexei of Russia, second ruler of the Romanov dynasty (1645-1676).  Some guests went so far as to actually wear original costumes from the period that were being stored at the Kremlin.

Click thumbnails for identification.

Some links, photos, fashion plates, polish outfit etc.


Hey, your blog is great, I love it and visit every day.

This thing, you called “Russian sleeves”, is actually “kontusz sleeves”. Since the end of XVI century it was  typical feature of polish national outfit. Just check what is “kontusz”.  It was very popular  in Commonwealth.  Kontusz also had its female version, very popular in XVIII century. See its pictures here:

 http://ubioryhistoryczne.blox.pl/html/1310721,262146,14,15.html?7,2010

I’ve found some nice web pages and I think you would enjoy watching it. 

These two focus on reconstruction of clothes from XII-XVIII century:

 http://www.nomina.pl/ubiory.html

 http://www.chantberry.com/rekonstrukcje.html

This page incudes fashion plates projected by Jan Matejko:

http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/polishcostumematejko14.htm

This one gives many information about Central and East Europe outfits:

 http://www.kismeta.com/diGrasse/PolArtCostumeWeapons.htm

This blog include great photos of polish ancient outfits:

 http://ubioryhistoryczne.blox.pl/html

This one includes pre-war photos, just click the years

 http://www.muzeummodyite.pl/kolekcja-wlasna/

This web page covers XIX and prewar men’s fashon but 2,4,6,7 unit includes women’s fashion. Some photos from XIX centures magazines, also fency outfits:

 http://www.buw.uw.edu.pl/wystawy/modameska/spis_tresci.html

This page is maybe the best, it shows photos of european princesses and aristocracy, sometimes in fency dresses:

 http://www.rvondeh.dircon.co.uk/

This web page covers whole history of fashion. Just click the links belove the writing: “HISTORIA UBIORU”. there are some of your photos:

 http://www.historiasztuki.com.pl/HISTORIA-UBIORU.html

 At the end you can see Teodora Matejko in her wedding dress in 1864 year. The dress was designed by her husband and stylized as polis national dress, basicly on kontusz. 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teodora_Matejko

I hope I haven’t borned you. If you are interested in more information just write to me. Bye. 

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Chopines, 1590-1610 Italy, the Met Museum

The chopine was a tall clog worn in primarily in Venice from the 15th to the early 17th centuries. While most examples are between three and five inches tall, some specimens of over a foot tall survive. Historical accounts testify to the necessity of the assistance of a pair of ladies maids to walk in the more extreme examples. As can be appreciated from the elaborate and fragile materials, the purpose of the chopine was as much to elevate the lady’s sartorial reputation as to elevate her skirt from the dirt of the streets and to increase her physical prominence. While this single chopine is very typical of the form in design and decoration, the blue color is less commonly seen than red or green. An additional feature of note also found on many other surviving examples is the leather sock lining with incised pattern of concentric squares.

Slippers, 1675-1710 Europe, the Met Museum
Posting for the crazy heels

Slippers, 1675-1710 Europe, the Met Museum

Posting for the crazy heels

Wedding of Maria de Medici and Henry IV of France by Jacopo Chimenti, 1600, Uffizi Gallery

Wedding of Maria de Medici and Henry IV of France by Jacopo Chimenti, 1600, Uffizi Gallery

Portrait of Mrs Salesbury with her Grandchildren Edward and Elizabeth Bagot by John Michael Wright, 1675 England, Tate Britain

Portrait of Mrs Salesbury with her Grandchildren Edward and Elizabeth Bagot by John Michael Wright, 1675 England, Tate Britain

Elisabeth Vekemans as a Young Girl by Cornelis de Vos, ca 1625, Museum Mayer van den Bergh

Elisabeth Vekemans as a Young Girl by Cornelis de Vos, ca 1625, Museum Mayer van den Bergh

Portrait of a 5-year-old boy with a parrot by Jacob Gerritsz Cuyp, 1625-50, Musee de Picardie

Portrait of a 5-year-old boy with a parrot by Jacob Gerritsz Cuyp, 1625-50, Musee de Picardie

Dress worn by a certain Marketa Lobkowicz, 1617 modern-day Czech Republic or Poland, Mikulov Museum

Dress worn by a certain Marketa Lobkowicz, 1617 modern-day Czech Republic or Poland, Mikulov Museum

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