Ghost

fripperiesandfobs:

Town dress with chemisette owned by Empress Josephine, First Empire

From the Chateau de Malmaision Costume Collection app:

“This high-waisted dress with its square, low-cut neckline and decorated with white embroidered flowers and leaves is typical of the fashion at the start of the First Empire. To conceal the low neckline, it could be worn with a chemisette which was slipped inside the dress. This one is in white muslin, embroidered with a sprinkling of flowers and embellished with a ruché trim. This outfit comes from the family of Madame Poyard who looked after the Empress’s wardrobe after 1809.”

Portrait of a Lady by William Artaud, 1809, New Walk Museum & Art Gallery

Portrait of a Lady by William Artaud, 1809, New Walk Museum & Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

Bonnet, 1800-05 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Bonnet. White silk with crossed tabs trimmed with cording over net lining at top; floss-covered buttons at sides and center. Heavier silk band twisted along edge; chenille and floss silk braid and net ruffles at edge. Pink silk ribbon bow on left side. Drawstring at back.

Bonnet, 1800-05 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Bonnet. White silk with crossed tabs trimmed with cording over net lining at top; floss-covered buttons at sides and center. Heavier silk band twisted along edge; chenille and floss silk braid and net ruffles at edge. Pink silk ribbon bow on left side. Drawstring at back.

Bonnet, ca 1800’s, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Woman’s bonnet, corded green silk.

Bonnet, ca 1800’s, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Woman’s bonnet, corded green silk.

Wrapper, ca 1855
The lot also includes a day dress (ca 1850), a spencer (ca 1820) and a bodice (ca 1800).
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Wrapper, ca 1855

The lot also includes a day dress (ca 1850), a spencer (ca 1820) and a bodice (ca 1800).

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Portrait of Elisabeth Henriette Bruun de Neergaard with her eldest son Henrik by Jens Juel, 1799-1800 Denmark, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
The Athenaeum gives the artist as George William Joy, but this can’t be right because he was born in 1844 - long after this painting was made.  I can’t find the painting in the museum’s collections to find out where the confusion comes from.

Portrait of Elisabeth Henriette Bruun de Neergaard with her eldest son Henrik by Jens Juel, 1799-1800 Denmark, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek

The Athenaeum gives the artist as George William Joy, but this can’t be right because he was born in 1844 - long after this painting was made.  I can’t find the painting in the museum’s collections to find out where the confusion comes from.

Fashion plate, 1806 England, La Belle Assemblée

Fashion plate, 1806 England, La Belle Assemblée

August fashions, 1806 England, La Belle Assemblée

August fashions, 1806 England, La Belle Assemblée

charlestonmuseum:

This wonderful cream silk capelet has scalloped edges embroidered with a delicate garland of chenille flowers. A shoulder cape like this would have been worn in the early 19th century with a fashionable Empire dress - a slender silhouette with high waist and puffed sleeves. It is likely that this one was worn by Elizabeth Cruger Guerin (1787-1874) who married John Cart, Jr. in Charleston in 1816.

It was given to us in 1955 by Mr. & Mrs. William Porter Cart. Mr. Cart’s paternal grandmother was Elizabeth Guerin Cart.

Chenille threads were popular throughout the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The velvety, fluffy silk thread originated in France and takes its name from the French word for caterpillar, chenille. Because they are so thick and puffy, just a few simple stitches are required to make a charming motif. Later chenille thread (from the mid-19th century) has a wire core rather than the silk core of these early strands.

See this capelet in person when it goes on exhibit as part of Coat Check, on display November 12, 2011 through March 4, 2012.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Dress, 1802 UK, Ladies’ Magazine
I love the flower details

Dress, 1802 UK, Ladies’ Magazine

I love the flower details

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