Ghost

fripperiesandfobs:

Town dress with chemisette owned by Empress Josephine, First Empire

From the Chateau de Malmaision Costume Collection app:

“This high-waisted dress with its square, low-cut neckline and decorated with white embroidered flowers and leaves is typical of the fashion at the start of the First Empire. To conceal the low neckline, it could be worn with a chemisette which was slipped inside the dress. This one is in white muslin, embroidered with a sprinkling of flowers and embellished with a ruché trim. This outfit comes from the family of Madame Poyard who looked after the Empress’s wardrobe after 1809.”

Straw bonnet, 1810-15 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Long, tubular straw bonnet with green silk ribbon.

Straw bonnet, 1810-15 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Long, tubular straw bonnet with green silk ribbon.

José Costa y Bonells (died 1870), Called Pepito by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, early-mid-1810’s Spain, the Met Museum

Pepito’s father, Rafael Costa de Quintana, was doctor to Ferdinand VII; his mother was the daughter of Jaime Bonells, doctor to the Alba family. The portrait is most closely related to works that Goya painted shortly after 1810 and seems to allude to the Spanish War of Independence, 1808–14. Pepito’s jacket is tailored in imitation of a soldier’s uniform, and his hair is cut in the Napoleonic fashion. The military analogy is further enhanced by the drum and the toy rifle with a fixed bayonet. Pepito’s pose is unquestionably intended as a variation on the so-called “dismounted equestrian portrait,” popular among military figures and royalty during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

José Costa y Bonells (died 1870), Called Pepito by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, early-mid-1810’s Spain, the Met Museum

Pepito’s father, Rafael Costa de Quintana, was doctor to Ferdinand VII; his mother was the daughter of Jaime Bonells, doctor to the Alba family. The portrait is most closely related to works that Goya painted shortly after 1810 and seems to allude to the Spanish War of Independence, 1808–14. Pepito’s jacket is tailored in imitation of a soldier’s uniform, and his hair is cut in the Napoleonic fashion. The military analogy is further enhanced by the drum and the toy rifle with a fixed bayonet. Pepito’s pose is unquestionably intended as a variation on the so-called “dismounted equestrian portrait,” popular among military figures and royalty during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

September “morning dress on a visit”, 1810 England, La Belle Assemblée
I’m assuming that this was meant to be worn in the morning when you’re staying at someone else’s house.

September “morning dress on a visit”, 1810 England, La Belle Assemblée

I’m assuming that this was meant to be worn in the morning when you’re staying at someone else’s house.

February evening dress, 1810 England, La Belle Assemblée

February evening dress, 1810 England, La Belle Assemblée

September walking dresses, 1810 England, Ackermann’s Repository

September walking dresses, 1810 England, Ackermann’s Repository

inspiringdresses:



Evening dress, 1805-10 UK (probably), the Met Museum
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Evening dress, ca 1810 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

Evening dress, ca 1810 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

Dress, 1805-10 France, Les Arts Décoratifs
Boots worn by Caroline Bonaparte, Queen of Naples, 1810 France (worn in Italy?), Les Arts Décoratifs

Boots worn by Caroline Bonaparte, Queen of Naples, 1810 France (worn in Italy?), Les Arts Décoratifs

Evening dress, 1805-10 France (possibly), the V&A Museum

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