Ghost

fripperiesandfobs:

Town dress with chemisette owned by Empress Josephine, First Empire

From the Chateau de Malmaision Costume Collection app:

“This high-waisted dress with its square, low-cut neckline and decorated with white embroidered flowers and leaves is typical of the fashion at the start of the First Empire. To conceal the low neckline, it could be worn with a chemisette which was slipped inside the dress. This one is in white muslin, embroidered with a sprinkling of flowers and embellished with a ruché trim. This outfit comes from the family of Madame Poyard who looked after the Empress’s wardrobe after 1809.”

Miss Eliza O’Neill as Belvidera in Thomas Otway’s ‘Venice Preserved’ by Arthur William Devis, 1816-22, Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Miss Eliza O’Neill as Belvidera in Thomas Otway’s ‘Venice Preserved’ by Arthur William Devis, 1816-22, Wolverhampton Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

Portrait of a Lady with an Ostrich Plume Hat by Joseph Clover, date not given (ca late 1810’s?), Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery

Portrait of a Lady with an Ostrich Plume Hat by Joseph Clover, date not given (ca late 1810’s?), Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

The Quilting Frolic by John Lewis Krimmel, 1813 Philadelphia, Winterthur Museum

The Quilting Frolic by John Lewis Krimmel, 1813 Philadelphia, Winterthur Museum

Portraits by Jacob Maentel and an unknown American artist, ca 1810-25, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library

I’m actually kind of baffled by the rooster in the boy’s portrait.

Walking dress, 1817-20 UK, the Victoria & Albert Museum



Echoes of military uniform give this walking dress a masculine flourish. The curving satin bands applied to the front of the spencer are reminiscent of the parallel lines of braiding which extended across the breast of many uniforms. Passementerie in the form of crescent-shaped moulds, looped cord and balls covered in floss silk replace the gilt or silver buttons on some regimental coats. The tassels on the collar ends and cuff bands evoke the tassels adorning boots, hats, sashes and cap lines of military accessories. In place of epaulettes, puffed oversleeves composed of linked bows emphasize the shoulder line.
The infusion of military styles into fashionable dress in Britain was largely due to the influence of the Napoleonic Wars (1793-1815). Among other factors, contact with foreign troops had a strong impact on civilian as well as regimental dress, and military ornament was translated into stylish trimmings on women’s hats, bodices, spencers and pelisses. The uniforms worn during this period were some of the most elaborate in the history of military dress, and their bright colours, frogging, braid and tassels fuelled the imagination of fashion for years to come.
Although this walking outfit is not based on any particular uniform, some garments closely followed certain styles. The uniform of the hussars, who were light cavalry, was particularly flamboyant as it was derived from Hungarian national dress. In her memoirs, Elizabeth Grant describes the admiration she received when she ‘walked out like a hussar in a dark cloth pelisse trimmed with fur and braided like the coat of a staff-officer, boots to match, and a fur cap set on one side, and kept on the head by means of a cord with long tassels’.

Walking dress, 1817-20 UK, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Echoes of military uniform give this walking dress a masculine flourish. The curving satin bands applied to the front of the spencer are reminiscent of the parallel lines of braiding which extended across the breast of many uniforms. Passementerie in the form of crescent-shaped moulds, looped cord and balls covered in floss silk replace the gilt or silver buttons on some regimental coats. The tassels on the collar ends and cuff bands evoke the tassels adorning boots, hats, sashes and cap lines of military accessories. In place of epaulettes, puffed oversleeves composed of linked bows emphasize the shoulder line.

The infusion of military styles into fashionable dress in Britain was largely due to the influence of the Napoleonic Wars (1793-1815). Among other factors, contact with foreign troops had a strong impact on civilian as well as regimental dress, and military ornament was translated into stylish trimmings on women’s hats, bodices, spencers and pelisses. The uniforms worn during this period were some of the most elaborate in the history of military dress, and their bright colours, frogging, braid and tassels fuelled the imagination of fashion for years to come.

Although this walking outfit is not based on any particular uniform, some garments closely followed certain styles. The uniform of the hussars, who were light cavalry, was particularly flamboyant as it was derived from Hungarian national dress. In her memoirs, Elizabeth Grant describes the admiration she received when she ‘walked out like a hussar in a dark cloth pelisse trimmed with fur and braided like the coat of a staff-officer, boots to match, and a fur cap set on one side, and kept on the head by means of a cord with long tassels’.

Bonnet, ca 1815 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Woven straw bonnet trimmed with cream silk taffeta ribbon and plaited straw

Bonnet, ca 1815 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Woven straw bonnet trimmed with cream silk taffeta ribbon and plaited straw

Straw bonnet, 1810-15 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Long, tubular straw bonnet with green silk ribbon.

Straw bonnet, 1810-15 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Long, tubular straw bonnet with green silk ribbon.

Bonnet, 1817, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Bonnet, 1817, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Spanish fancy dress for September, 1819 UK, La Belle Assemblée

Spanish fancy dress for September, 1819 UK, La Belle Assemblée

Wrapper, ca 1855
The lot also includes a day dress (ca 1850), a spencer (ca 1820) and a bodice (ca 1800).
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Wrapper, ca 1855

The lot also includes a day dress (ca 1850), a spencer (ca 1820) and a bodice (ca 1800).

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Button Theme