Ghost
March indoor morning dress, 1812 England, Ackermann’s Repository

March indoor morning dress, 1812 England, Ackermann’s Repository

December mourning dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

December mourning dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

August evening dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

August evening dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

July opera dress (and a suit for boys), 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

July opera dress (and a suit for boys), 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

July promenade dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

July promenade dress, 1811 England, Ackermann’s Repository

September walking dresses, 1810 England, Ackermann’s Repository

September walking dresses, 1810 England, Ackermann’s Repository

charlestonmuseum:

This wonderful cream silk capelet has scalloped edges embroidered with a delicate garland of chenille flowers. A shoulder cape like this would have been worn in the early 19th century with a fashionable Empire dress - a slender silhouette with high waist and puffed sleeves. It is likely that this one was worn by Elizabeth Cruger Guerin (1787-1874) who married John Cart, Jr. in Charleston in 1816.

It was given to us in 1955 by Mr. & Mrs. William Porter Cart. Mr. Cart’s paternal grandmother was Elizabeth Guerin Cart.

Chenille threads were popular throughout the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The velvety, fluffy silk thread originated in France and takes its name from the French word for caterpillar, chenille. Because they are so thick and puffy, just a few simple stitches are required to make a charming motif. Later chenille thread (from the mid-19th century) has a wire core rather than the silk core of these early strands.

See this capelet in person when it goes on exhibit as part of Coat Check, on display November 12, 2011 through March 4, 2012.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

inspiringdresses:



Evening dress, 1805-10 UK (probably), the Met Museum
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Shoes, 1800’s-1820’s England, the V&A Museum


Slippers like these were relatively cheap to produce and the middle or upper-class ladies who wore them might purchase several pairs at a time to wear over the course of a few weeks or months. This was not necessarily because they required a different pair for each outfit but rather because the lightweight soles and silk uppers of these elegant shoes were not very durable.
The square toe and throat style of ladies’ slippers or ‘sandle shoes’ was popular from the 1820s, when it began to eclipse the earlier pointed toe and curved throat style which first came about in the 1790s. Ribbons to tie round the ankles and bows attached at the throat at the front of the shoe were a feature of this type of shoe throughout.

Shoes, 1800’s-1820’s England, the V&A Museum

Slippers like these were relatively cheap to produce and the middle or upper-class ladies who wore them might purchase several pairs at a time to wear over the course of a few weeks or months. This was not necessarily because they required a different pair for each outfit but rather because the lightweight soles and silk uppers of these elegant shoes were not very durable.

The square toe and throat style of ladies’ slippers or ‘sandle shoes’ was popular from the 1820s, when it began to eclipse the earlier pointed toe and curved throat style which first came about in the 1790s. Ribbons to tie round the ankles and bows attached at the throat at the front of the shoe were a feature of this type of shoe throughout.

Evening dress, ca 1810 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

Evening dress, ca 1810 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

Dress, 1805-10 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

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