Ghost
Evening dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House
See some bigger images here.

Evening dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House

See some bigger images here.

(Source: liverpoolmuseums.org.uk)

Day dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House
See some bigger images here.

Day dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House

See some bigger images here.

(Source: liverpoolmuseums.org.uk)

Mourning poke bonnet, ca 1840 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The style of the poke bonnet manifests the demure and modest style that followed the young Queen Victoria’s accession to the throne in 1838. This severe all-black example was probably worn for mourning, a long-standing custom that the Queen elevated to a social institution, especially after the death of her beloved husband, Prince Albert.

Mourning poke bonnet, ca 1840 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The style of the poke bonnet manifests the demure and modest style that followed the young Queen Victoria’s accession to the throne in 1838. This severe all-black example was probably worn for mourning, a long-standing custom that the Queen elevated to a social institution, especially after the death of her beloved husband, Prince Albert.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Doll’s bonnet, ca 1840 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Doll’s bonnet of dark blue satin faced with yellow taffeta with light blue ribbon ties, trimmed on top with wreath of artificial flowers, dark blue velvet ribbon, and blonde lace.

Doll’s bonnet, ca 1840 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Doll’s bonnet of dark blue satin faced with yellow taffeta with light blue ribbon ties, trimmed on top with wreath of artificial flowers, dark blue velvet ribbon, and blonde lace.

Bonnet by A Partridge & Co, ca 1840 Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

White silk bonnet, trimmed with net and lace in zig-zag pattern around edges, with pink silk ribbon arranged inside and forming ties. Label: “A Partridge and Co./Mode de Paris, 201 Washington St., Boston.”

Bonnet by A Partridge & Co, ca 1840 Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

White silk bonnet, trimmed with net and lace in zig-zag pattern around edges, with pink silk ribbon arranged inside and forming ties. Label: “A Partridge and Co./Mode de Paris, 201 Washington St., Boston.”

Poke bonnet, ca 1840 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Poke bonnet, ca 1840 France, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Leghorn bonnet, ca 1840 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Yellow leghorn; brim and crown in one piece; designed so that brim frames face closely; short cape of leghorn, trimmed with green ribbon divided down back so that one half is ribbed and the other half ombré; brim lined with cream colored georgette crepe; cluster of artificial flowers including white violets, on each side of brim facing.

Leghorn bonnet, ca 1840 US, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Yellow leghorn; brim and crown in one piece; designed so that brim frames face closely; short cape of leghorn, trimmed with green ribbon divided down back so that one half is ribbed and the other half ombré; brim lined with cream colored georgette crepe; cluster of artificial flowers including white violets, on each side of brim facing.

Emanuel Ritter von Neuwall by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, 1841 Germany, Wienmuseum
Look at this neckbeard.

Emanuel Ritter von Neuwall by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, 1841 Germany, Wienmuseum

Look at this neckbeard.

The Williamson Family by John Mix Stanley, 1841-42 US (New York?), the Metropolitan Museum of Art
I think the child is a boy, but I’m not entirely sure.  The clothes and hair are awfully feminine, but that toy horse is damning.  Tough one.

The Williamson Family by John Mix Stanley, 1841-42 US (New York?), the Metropolitan Museum of Art

I think the child is a boy, but I’m not entirely sure.  The clothes and hair are awfully feminine, but that toy horse is damning.  Tough one.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Portrait of a Woman by Alexey Tyranov, 1841 Russia, the Kursk Gallery

Portrait of a Woman by Alexey Tyranov, 1841 Russia, the Kursk Gallery

Portrait of a Woman by Apollon Mokritsky, 1841, Kaluga Art Museum
EDIT: Had to include this response by there-is-no-box because I thought it was great.
I almost scrolled past this, but something about it caught me off guard.
I think it’s her eyes. They’re looking straight at you and they’re not coy or modest or deferential. She’s looking straight at you; you, personally. And she looks like she’s thinking about something, something other than “here you may gaze at my beauty.” She just seems so active when women are so often portrayed as passive

Portrait of a Woman by Apollon Mokritsky, 1841, Kaluga Art Museum

EDIT: Had to include this response by there-is-no-box because I thought it was great.

I almost scrolled past this, but something about it caught me off guard.

I think it’s her eyes. They’re looking straight at you and they’re not coy or modest or deferential. She’s looking straight at you; you, personally. And she looks like she’s thinking about something, something other than “here you may gaze at my beauty.” She just seems so active when women are so often portrayed as passive

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