Ghost

Tips from elsewhere in the Winter 1885-86 issue of Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Cure for Burns.—Equal parts of lime and lard, stirred together, is excellent for burns and scalds.

Cure for Ringworms.—Gunpowder, wet with apple vinegar and applied to ringworms, is a sure cure.

Bangs are entirely out of fashion.  So is the Grecian knot.

Care of the Hair.—The best specialists on treatment of the hair say, that the hair should be washed once in six weeks and not oftener, and that castile soap and not borax, soda, or any other drying material, should be used. 

Short and long waists are equally fashionable.

Sashes and sash effects are so fashionable that this might be called an epoch of sashes, and no one is considered either too young or too old to to wear a sash of some description.

Real India shawls, not made up into mantles but worn over the shoulders, just as grand-mama used to wear hers, are again in fashion and will be worn this season by the most elegant women in society.

Lace pins of guitars, violins, banjos, and other musical instruments are unique and fashionable.  They are perfect copies of the instruments, having strings and keys.

Clean hen-houses and runs will bring in a good share of clean profits.

(From an ad) Prevent Pneumonia - By wearing SMITH’S PATENT PERFORATED BUCK-SKIN UNDERGARMENTS.  They afford, to persons susceptible to cold, the best protection against Pneumonia, Rheumatism and all Lung Diseases.  Recommended to Ladies and Gentlemen by all physicians.  Send for circular.  D.C. HALL & CO., SOLE MANUFACTURERS, 86 LEONARD STREET, NEW YORK.

The wing of turkeys, geese and chickens are good to wash and clean windows, as they leave no dust nor lint as cloth.

When going from a warm room out into the cold air close your mouth and breathe through your nose to prevent taking cold.

A “Worth Knowing” column and various ads, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Not all of these are clothing-related, but it’s very interesting:

Worth Knowing
Veils are not so much worn as formerly.
R. S. V. P. is never put on invitations nowadays.  It is considered countrified.
Bridesmaids’ fans are made in the shape of hearts, have long handles, and are covered with flowers.
Piano-back decoration is now a thing of the past.  The backs of pianos are now left without painting or ornamentation of any kind.
It is wise to give all clothing and bedding, when first brought out for use, a thorough airing.  They should be placed in the yard, and well shaken to remove all impurities.
The pretty custom of leaving a bunch of flowers with a card when calling is still fashionable.  The bunch is small, and the flowers contain some suitable sentiment.
Several inquiries have reached us lately as to the most appropriate dress to be worn at confirmations.  The more simple they are in style the better.  The whole toilet should be white, not necessarily shoes, which are sometimes bronze, sometimes black, but as often either white kid or satin.  The choice of material for confirmation dresses lies between white Indian muslin, book muslin made up over silk, white nainsook, white surah, nun’s-cloth, alpaca, cashmere and soft washing silk.  The more plainly these can be made the better.  Trimmings of almost any kind are not considered appropriate; no lace is used, no fringes, no beads, merely a large ribbon sash.  The arrangement of the skirt consists mostly of three box-pleats or three kilt pleats, a drapery above this finishing at the side, and bouffant round the waist, and, in nine cases out of ten, the bodice is made plain and full, with a band.  Plain waterfall skirts, that is, the material simply hemmed and made very full at the waist, with no further adornment, but some looped bows at the sides, is a style of making to be recommended for any soft woolen stuff.  Veils are not nearly so much worn as caps, made of the clearest tulle, hemmed, and a point falling over the face to the waist.  Either silk, kid, or Suede gloves complete the dress.

A “Worth Knowing” column and various ads, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Not all of these are clothing-related, but it’s very interesting:

Worth Knowing

Veils are not so much worn as formerly.

R. S. V. P. is never put on invitations nowadays.  It is considered countrified.

Bridesmaids’ fans are made in the shape of hearts, have long handles, and are covered with flowers.

Piano-back decoration is now a thing of the past.  The backs of pianos are now left without painting or ornamentation of any kind.

It is wise to give all clothing and bedding, when first brought out for use, a thorough airing.  They should be placed in the yard, and well shaken to remove all impurities.

The pretty custom of leaving a bunch of flowers with a card when calling is still fashionable.  The bunch is small, and the flowers contain some suitable sentiment.

Several inquiries have reached us lately as to the most appropriate dress to be worn at confirmations.  The more simple they are in style the better.  The whole toilet should be white, not necessarily shoes, which are sometimes bronze, sometimes black, but as often either white kid or satin.  The choice of material for confirmation dresses lies between white Indian muslin, book muslin made up over silk, white nainsook, white surah, nun’s-cloth, alpaca, cashmere and soft washing silk.  The more plainly these can be made the better.  Trimmings of almost any kind are not considered appropriate; no lace is used, no fringes, no beads, merely a large ribbon sash.  The arrangement of the skirt consists mostly of three box-pleats or three kilt pleats, a drapery above this finishing at the side, and bouffant round the waist, and, in nine cases out of ten, the bodice is made plain and full, with a band.  Plain waterfall skirts, that is, the material simply hemmed and made very full at the waist, with no further adornment, but some looped bows at the sides, is a style of making to be recommended for any soft woolen stuff.  Veils are not nearly so much worn as caps, made of the clearest tulle, hemmed, and a point falling over the face to the waist.  Either silk, kid, or Suede gloves complete the dress.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Continued:

[Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines] lace, broken here and there with loops of pale pink and light blue ribbon.
A caprice of many ladies is to have their house-costumes all-white; and very dainty are princesse gowns of cream-white cashmere or surah, trimmed with quantities of soft lace or bands of white down.
Figure No. 8, illustrates a neat home-dress of soft silk, lined with quilted silk.  It is light-blue in color, and is made with short full train.  The front, pockets, cuffs, and collar, are artistically embroidered in yellow marguerites with shaded brown and green foliage.  There is a silken cord and tassels about the waist.  The cap is made of cream Valenciennes lace, with loops of narrow blue ribbon in front.  A favorite new material for house-wear is ivory-white bourette cloth.  The rough surface is barred with twisted gold and silver threads, and soft white, flossy balls.  Wool armure goods and camel’s-hair cloths, in white and cream, are also much used for tea-gowns.
And still the rage for lace of all kinds, continues.  It is one of the few articles for wear that seasons have no effect upon whatever.  The dress of sheer mull, destined to be worn in August, smothered in lace just as is its pretentious sister that will sweep the floor of the December ball-rooms.
A pretty style of making a lace dress is shown in the illustration Figure No. 9.  The lace, which is cream Spanish net, is draped, over a skirt of light silk, high on both hips, and falls without further looping over the train.  There is a sash of bright olive velvet.  Over the tight-fitting bodice of silk, lace covered, is a little Figaro pointed vest of olive velvet.  The points, back and front, are fastened with a rhinestone buckle.  The elbow-length sleeves are made of alternate layers of insertion and plain net.  There is a high velvet dog-collar about the throat, studded with rhinestones, and fringed with tiny olive-tinted feathers.  The gloves are long tan gants de suéde.
Rhinestone ornaments are still in favor for holding draperies in place, and are especially appropriate when the draperies are lace.  Among the curious designs is a great dragon with mouth open, showing a double row of pearl teeth, and enriched further with a pair of glittering ruby eyes.  But designs of this description are a caprice, and it is always far better taste to choose the really graceful arrows, spears, crescents, etc., that serve the purpose without shocking sensitive nerves.
The afternoon house-dress shown at Figure No. 10, is certainly an original design.  It is made of blue plush, stamped with bronze figures; and an Oriental gauze run with silver and gold threads.  The skirt of the plush is bordered with a full gauze ruching.  The polonaise is laid in full deep pleats in the back; the front, from the throat down, opens over the gauze very full pleated; narrowed in at the waist with a plain, plush band, fastened with a silver buckle.  The gauze is carried around under the polonaise to simulate a second skirt.  The two front points of the polonaise are finished with bronze tassels.  The sleeves are elbow-length; trimmed with a gauze puff, and pleating.  There is said to be more variety in Oriental laces than any other of the inexpensive, or rather those laces that are classed under the head of novelty, and which are inexpensive in comparison with the costly pointes.  Black Oriental laces are now in the market, and they are very good in effect.  Some of them are embroidered in floss and silk, intermixed with fine colored beads.
Old-time Llama and thread laces are being reëstablished in favor; indeed, the more antique looking the lace, the handsomer it is considered, even if time’s finger has rubbed off its sheen and given it in its place a color that the uninitiated would call rusty.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Continued:

[Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines] lace, broken here and there with loops of pale pink and light blue ribbon.

A caprice of many ladies is to have their house-costumes all-white; and very dainty are princesse gowns of cream-white cashmere or surah, trimmed with quantities of soft lace or bands of white down.

Figure No. 8, illustrates a neat home-dress of soft silk, lined with quilted silk.  It is light-blue in color, and is made with short full train.  The front, pockets, cuffs, and collar, are artistically embroidered in yellow marguerites with shaded brown and green foliage.  There is a silken cord and tassels about the waist.  The cap is made of cream Valenciennes lace, with loops of narrow blue ribbon in front.  A favorite new material for house-wear is ivory-white bourette cloth.  The rough surface is barred with twisted gold and silver threads, and soft white, flossy balls.  Wool armure goods and camel’s-hair cloths, in white and cream, are also much used for tea-gowns.

And still the rage for lace of all kinds, continues.  It is one of the few articles for wear that seasons have no effect upon whatever.  The dress of sheer mull, destined to be worn in August, smothered in lace just as is its pretentious sister that will sweep the floor of the December ball-rooms.

A pretty style of making a lace dress is shown in the illustration Figure No. 9.  The lace, which is cream Spanish net, is draped, over a skirt of light silk, high on both hips, and falls without further looping over the train.  There is a sash of bright olive velvet.  Over the tight-fitting bodice of silk, lace covered, is a little Figaro pointed vest of olive velvet.  The points, back and front, are fastened with a rhinestone buckle.  The elbow-length sleeves are made of alternate layers of insertion and plain net.  There is a high velvet dog-collar about the throat, studded with rhinestones, and fringed with tiny olive-tinted feathers.  The gloves are long tan gants de suéde.

Rhinestone ornaments are still in favor for holding draperies in place, and are especially appropriate when the draperies are lace.  Among the curious designs is a great dragon with mouth open, showing a double row of pearl teeth, and enriched further with a pair of glittering ruby eyes.  But designs of this description are a caprice, and it is always far better taste to choose the really graceful arrows, spears, crescents, etc., that serve the purpose without shocking sensitive nerves.

The afternoon house-dress shown at Figure No. 10, is certainly an original design.  It is made of blue plush, stamped with bronze figures; and an Oriental gauze run with silver and gold threads.  The skirt of the plush is bordered with a full gauze ruching.  The polonaise is laid in full deep pleats in the back; the front, from the throat down, opens over the gauze very full pleated; narrowed in at the waist with a plain, plush band, fastened with a silver buckle.  The gauze is carried around under the polonaise to simulate a second skirt.  The two front points of the polonaise are finished with bronze tassels.  The sleeves are elbow-length; trimmed with a gauze puff, and pleating.  There is said to be more variety in Oriental laces than any other of the inexpensive, or rather those laces that are classed under the head of novelty, and which are inexpensive in comparison with the costly pointes.  Black Oriental laces are now in the market, and they are very good in effect.  Some of them are embroidered in floss and silk, intermixed with fine colored beads.

Old-time Llama and thread laces are being reëstablished in favor; indeed, the more antique looking the lace, the handsomer it is considered, even if time’s finger has rubbed off its sheen and given it in its place a color that the uninitiated would call rusty.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Continued from here:

[The remainder of the] garment is of black silk Armure.  Two additional beaded panels separate the pleated side-pieces from the puffed back.  The loose sleeves are of the armure, and a handsome jet passementerie borders the panels.  The bonnet worn with this mantle is a capote with high, puffed silk crown, and gathered front of black velvet.  The only trimming is a shaded bunch of cardinal ostrich-tips.  To the right in the same illustration is a stylish costume of deep wine-colored gros-grain.  The pleated skirt has a high, full drapery at the back.  The casaque, coming low over the hips, is trimmed with bands of wine-colored silk braid, threaded slightly with gold.  Each band terminates in a double-loop.  The skirt draper is carried to the waist-line in the back, hiding that portion of the casaque.  There is a high braided collar and cuffs.  The hat of silver-gray felt is trimmed with shaded cardinal ribbon.
Bourettes and boucle cloths, and all others with a rough surface are in demand for street dresses.  A new material has a dark surface thickly sprinkled with large tri-colored balls, in the Eastern shades.  This is rather striking in in effect, and it is used only for panels and trimming, in conjunction with plain goods.
Astrakhan is another trimming that will be extensively used in the same manner.  It comes in black and brown shades, and is greatly reduced in price this season.
There is a rage for rich garnitures this winter and many new and elegant novelties are in the market.  Bands of chenille, the broader the handsomer, are thickly studded with jet, or covered with balls or drooping pendants of chenille.  One especially artistic pattern, is a series of autumn leaves, made of twisted silk, from which hang beaded acorns.
There is an endless assortment of beads, new both in shape and color.  There are the spear-head beads, the dumb-bell-shaped beads, the lance-pointed beads, the triangular beads, and a dozen more odd shapes.  They come in jet of various colors, steel, crystal, wood, silver, gold, and pearl.
These novelty trimming command high prices, but an advantage is that they are made of the very best materials; no inferior silk is used, and none but the finest grades of jet.  These are said to afford the manufacturers quite as much profit; and the trade certainly more satisfaction.
Shown at Figure No. 6, is a home-dress of gray faille, mixed with a shaded gray stamped cashmere.  A pleating of faille borders the square-train.  The figured cashmere forms the double drapery in front, ornamented with twisted silk fringe.  There is a pointed shirred plastron inserted in the lower drapery; the same forms the vest in the square-cut bodice, and also the pointed piece in the back.  The bodice is pointed over the hips, finished with fringe, and a triple fold of the plain material.  The back drapery is of faille, very slightly looped.
Many ladies find a plain round skirt of velvet, velveteen, or corduroy, quite indispensable for winter.  They are finished simply with plissés of the same, and almost any description of overskirt can be worn with them.  Black and brown are the most serviceable colors.
Many of the richest walking-dresses and afternoon reception toilettes are made of velvet, in the dark shades of blue, brown, and gray; all other colors are reserved strictly for evening wear.  Every winter there is a strong effort to popularize the various purple tints; an effort that is never attended with much success.  Very few shades of purple are either becoming or pretty.  They all lack warmth; and under gas-light the pale purple shades become heavy and dingy.  Purple is never a very safe color; and when it is chosen, it is always a wise precaution to examine it first in the sunlight, and then under a strong gas-light.
At Figure No. 7, is a dark gray velveteen costume, the skirt run with bands of silver braid.  The velveteen tunic is carried high on the left side, and is puffed on the hips.  The back drapery is also high.  The waist is pointed back and front, and is trimmed with a plain plastron and revers, striped with silver.  The cuffs are the same.  The pointed bonnet is of gray felt, trimmed with a bunch of gray and crimson feathers.  The strings are of serviceable velvet, crimson and gray.
Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines… (continued)

The paragraph about colors is bolded because it reflects color trends in the mid-1880’s.  Purple was very popular in the late 1860’s, but by this time it was considered ugly and risky to wear.  Also, it’s interesting to see the tip they give about checking colors both outdoors in sunlight and indoors in gaslight.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Continued from here:

[The remainder of the] garment is of black silk Armure.  Two additional beaded panels separate the pleated side-pieces from the puffed back.  The loose sleeves are of the armure, and a handsome jet passementerie borders the panels.  The bonnet worn with this mantle is a capote with high, puffed silk crown, and gathered front of black velvet.  The only trimming is a shaded bunch of cardinal ostrich-tips.  To the right in the same illustration is a stylish costume of deep wine-colored gros-grain.  The pleated skirt has a high, full drapery at the back.  The casaque, coming low over the hips, is trimmed with bands of wine-colored silk braid, threaded slightly with gold.  Each band terminates in a double-loop.  The skirt draper is carried to the waist-line in the back, hiding that portion of the casaque.  There is a high braided collar and cuffs.  The hat of silver-gray felt is trimmed with shaded cardinal ribbon.

Bourettes and boucle cloths, and all others with a rough surface are in demand for street dresses.  A new material has a dark surface thickly sprinkled with large tri-colored balls, in the Eastern shades.  This is rather striking in in effect, and it is used only for panels and trimming, in conjunction with plain goods.

Astrakhan is another trimming that will be extensively used in the same manner.  It comes in black and brown shades, and is greatly reduced in price this season.

There is a rage for rich garnitures this winter and many new and elegant novelties are in the market.  Bands of chenille, the broader the handsomer, are thickly studded with jet, or covered with balls or drooping pendants of chenille.  One especially artistic pattern, is a series of autumn leaves, made of twisted silk, from which hang beaded acorns.

There is an endless assortment of beads, new both in shape and color.  There are the spear-head beads, the dumb-bell-shaped beads, the lance-pointed beads, the triangular beads, and a dozen more odd shapes.  They come in jet of various colors, steel, crystal, wood, silver, gold, and pearl.

These novelty trimming command high prices, but an advantage is that they are made of the very best materials; no inferior silk is used, and none but the finest grades of jet.  These are said to afford the manufacturers quite as much profit; and the trade certainly more satisfaction.

Shown at Figure No. 6, is a home-dress of gray faille, mixed with a shaded gray stamped cashmere.  A pleating of faille borders the square-train.  The figured cashmere forms the double drapery in front, ornamented with twisted silk fringe.  There is a pointed shirred plastron inserted in the lower drapery; the same forms the vest in the square-cut bodice, and also the pointed piece in the back.  The bodice is pointed over the hips, finished with fringe, and a triple fold of the plain material.  The back drapery is of faille, very slightly looped.

Many ladies find a plain round skirt of velvet, velveteen, or corduroy, quite indispensable for winter.  They are finished simply with plissés of the same, and almost any description of overskirt can be worn with them.  Black and brown are the most serviceable colors.

Many of the richest walking-dresses and afternoon reception toilettes are made of velvet, in the dark shades of blue, brown, and gray; all other colors are reserved strictly for evening wear.  Every winter there is a strong effort to popularize the various purple tints; an effort that is never attended with much success.  Very few shades of purple are either becoming or pretty.  They all lack warmth; and under gas-light the pale purple shades become heavy and dingy.  Purple is never a very safe color; and when it is chosen, it is always a wise precaution to examine it first in the sunlight, and then under a strong gas-light.

At Figure No. 7, is a dark gray velveteen costume, the skirt run with bands of silver braid.  The velveteen tunic is carried high on the left side, and is puffed on the hips.  The back drapery is also high.  The waist is pointed back and front, and is trimmed with a plain plastron and revers, striped with silver.  The cuffs are the same.  The pointed bonnet is of gray felt, trimmed with a bunch of gray and crimson feathers.  The strings are of serviceable velvet, crimson and gray.

Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines… (continued)

The paragraph about colors is bolded because it reflects color trends in the mid-1880’s.  Purple was very popular in the late 1860’s, but by this time it was considered ugly and risky to wear.  Also, it’s interesting to see the tip they give about checking colors both outdoors in sunlight and indoors in gaslight.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
The wedding dress described on this page is here.
Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.
A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.
A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.
Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.
The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.
Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.
To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".
I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

The wedding dress described on this page is here.

Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.

A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.

A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.

Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.

The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.

Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.

To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".

I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

Wedding dress, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Described in the next post.

Wedding dress, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Described in the next post.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Fashion Gossip
THE WINTER season is invariably the time when fashion reaches the very summit of splendor.  The other seasons have each their characteristics.  Spring and summer styles are cool and dainty; those for autumn show more elaboration; but the cunning Dame Fashion has a way of treasuring-up her richest and choicest fancies, and bringing them out when they vie with nature’s glistening mantle of snow.
As usual, this season’s extremes rule.  The most popular street-dress is severely plain; the accepted ball-costume is as elegant as massive silk and costly lace can make it.  In walking costumes the English cut reigns supreme.
Plaid and checked cloths are the materials most used in conjunction with plain cloth.  Indeed, in some of the newest suits the three patterns of striped, checked, and plain, all shading to the one color, are combined.  The round, short skirt is of the plain goods, finished with a fine pleating of the striped; while the checked material forms the drapery.  The latter continues to be festooned very high and full in the back.
When the weather is sufficiently mild, short capes, reaching just below the waist, are worn with these English, or tailor-made, costumes.  A stylish model for these capes is a series of three, one laid over the other, alternating in length; finished simply with several rows of stitching.  They are made of plaid or plain self-colored cloth, matching the rest of the suit.  These short capes are also repeated in plain or beaded lace for theatre and opera wear, and are very dressy additions to the toilette.  The English toque, the small, turban-shaped hat, made of cloth, is usually chosen to be worn with these walking-suits.
The Coquette Mantle, an entirely new model, is a modified description of the shoulder-cape, and is illustrated at the heading of this article.  It is made of heavy black Sicilienne, richly trimmed with cut-jet passementerie.  The shoulders are very high, and the seams below are fitted into the arms, ending just above the elbow, where a drooping jet ornament falls over the arm.  The garment is cut very narrow at the waist, back and front.  Two long, double loops depend in front, and the back pieces are caught-up in high poufs, fastened with a handsome jet ornament; the two points are likewise finished with drooping ornaments.  A high, straight collar is beaded to match.  The bonnet, of Sicilienne silk, is full-pleated at the back of the crown, and is gathered in front.  A large cluster of variegated leaves is placed in front; and gros-grain ribbon-strings are used.
For everyday-wear the walking-jacket most in vogue in the regular cut-away.  The material is invariably cloth, of good quality; in color it may either be the sombre shades of black or brown, or the gay shades of cardinal or very deep yellow, or subdued or bright.  These jackets are worn over skirts of black or brown silk or cloth, and are conceded to impart an air of distinction to the costume.  Many ladies, however, prefer having their skirts and jackets subdued in color and giving their gayer taste full vent in their bonnets and gloves.  The seal-skin jacket remains undisturbed in its popularity — and why?  They have much to commend them; they seem to have a magic charm; they are delightfully cosy on a frosty day; and they are rarely uncomfortably warm on a mild day.
At Figure No. 2, is shown a waist that is suitable both for home-wear and for the street, when the weather permits.  It is made of seal-brown Ottoman silk; the vest-front is of chantilly lace; the same forms deep pleats.  The Ottoman silk is folded in revers down the front; and is buttoned over to simulate a plastron-vest.  The silk is pleated fan-shaped in the back.  The high hat is formed of alternate layers of seal-brown and gilt-braid.  On the top there is a tuft of ostrich-tips; brown and gold intermixed with loops of satin ribbon, the same shades.  The velvet collar, about the throat is fastened with a chain of Etruscan gold.
The poet sings of the spring-tide of marriage; but the modern fashionable season for marriage we all now concede to be the fall and the early winter months.  The… (continued in the next post)

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Fashion Gossip

THE WINTER season is invariably the time when fashion reaches the very summit of splendor.  The other seasons have each their characteristics.  Spring and summer styles are cool and dainty; those for autumn show more elaboration; but the cunning Dame Fashion has a way of treasuring-up her richest and choicest fancies, and bringing them out when they vie with nature’s glistening mantle of snow.

As usual, this season’s extremes rule.  The most popular street-dress is severely plain; the accepted ball-costume is as elegant as massive silk and costly lace can make it.  In walking costumes the English cut reigns supreme.

Plaid and checked cloths are the materials most used in conjunction with plain cloth.  Indeed, in some of the newest suits the three patterns of striped, checked, and plain, all shading to the one color, are combined.  The round, short skirt is of the plain goods, finished with a fine pleating of the striped; while the checked material forms the drapery.  The latter continues to be festooned very high and full in the back.

When the weather is sufficiently mild, short capes, reaching just below the waist, are worn with these English, or tailor-made, costumes.  A stylish model for these capes is a series of three, one laid over the other, alternating in length; finished simply with several rows of stitching.  They are made of plaid or plain self-colored cloth, matching the rest of the suit.  These short capes are also repeated in plain or beaded lace for theatre and opera wear, and are very dressy additions to the toilette.  The English toque, the small, turban-shaped hat, made of cloth, is usually chosen to be worn with these walking-suits.

The Coquette Mantle, an entirely new model, is a modified description of the shoulder-cape, and is illustrated at the heading of this article.  It is made of heavy black Sicilienne, richly trimmed with cut-jet passementerie.  The shoulders are very high, and the seams below are fitted into the arms, ending just above the elbow, where a drooping jet ornament falls over the arm.  The garment is cut very narrow at the waist, back and front.  Two long, double loops depend in front, and the back pieces are caught-up in high poufs, fastened with a handsome jet ornament; the two points are likewise finished with drooping ornaments.  A high, straight collar is beaded to match.  The bonnet, of Sicilienne silk, is full-pleated at the back of the crown, and is gathered in front.  A large cluster of variegated leaves is placed in front; and gros-grain ribbon-strings are used.

For everyday-wear the walking-jacket most in vogue in the regular cut-away.  The material is invariably cloth, of good quality; in color it may either be the sombre shades of black or brown, or the gay shades of cardinal or very deep yellow, or subdued or bright.  These jackets are worn over skirts of black or brown silk or cloth, and are conceded to impart an air of distinction to the costume.  Many ladies, however, prefer having their skirts and jackets subdued in color and giving their gayer taste full vent in their bonnets and gloves.  The seal-skin jacket remains undisturbed in its popularity — and why?  They have much to commend them; they seem to have a magic charm; they are delightfully cosy on a frosty day; and they are rarely uncomfortably warm on a mild day.

At Figure No. 2, is shown a waist that is suitable both for home-wear and for the street, when the weather permits.  It is made of seal-brown Ottoman silk; the vest-front is of chantilly lace; the same forms deep pleats.  The Ottoman silk is folded in revers down the front; and is buttoned over to simulate a plastron-vest.  The silk is pleated fan-shaped in the back.  The high hat is formed of alternate layers of seal-brown and gilt-braid.  On the top there is a tuft of ostrich-tips; brown and gold intermixed with loops of satin ribbon, the same shades.  The velvet collar, about the throat is fastened with a chain of Etruscan gold.

The poet sings of the spring-tide of marriage; but the modern fashionable season for marriage we all now concede to be the fall and the early winter months.  The… (continued in the next post)

Walking dress, dinner or reception dress and visiting or home dress, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
The description page (Large image)

Walking dress, dinner or reception dress and visiting or home dress, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

The description page (Large image)

hatsfromhistory:

carolathhabsburg:

Beauty in riding habits. Late 1880s

She is exquisite!

Riding habits were constructed with a feminine silhouette, but were given such masculine details as buttons, cuffs and jacket lapels.  A formal men’s hat, such as the top hat shown here, was worn in Victorian times (and later) - sometimes with a veil on the back.
The tradition of menswear in riding habits is an old one.  In 1666, a young Samuel Pepys wrote:
Walking in the galleries at White Hall, I find the Ladies of Honour dressed in their riding garbs, with coats and doublets with deep skirts, just, for all the world, like mine; and buttoned their doublets up to the breast, with periwigs under their hats; so that, only for a long petticoat dragging under their men’s coats, nobody could take them for women in any point whatever; which was an odde sight, and a sight did not please me.
They were often trained or longer on one side of the skirt so as to protect modesty while riding sidesaddle.

hatsfromhistory:

carolathhabsburg:

Beauty in riding habits. Late 1880s

She is exquisite!

Riding habits were constructed with a feminine silhouette, but were given such masculine details as buttons, cuffs and jacket lapels.  A formal men’s hat, such as the top hat shown here, was worn in Victorian times (and later) - sometimes with a veil on the back.

The tradition of menswear in riding habits is an old one.  In 1666, a young Samuel Pepys wrote:

Walking in the galleries at White Hall, I find the Ladies of Honour dressed in their riding garbs, with coats and doublets with deep skirts, just, for all the world, like mine; and buttoned their doublets up to the breast, with periwigs under their hats; so that, only for a long petticoat dragging under their men’s coats, nobody could take them for women in any point whatever; which was an odde sight, and a sight did not please me.

They were often trained or longer on one side of the skirt so as to protect modesty while riding sidesaddle.

auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 
Missouri, c. 1890
Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 

Missouri, c. 1890

Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

charlestonmuseum:

Purple wool, velvet and lace two-piece Worth dress, c. 1890. The period was defined by the well-corseted waist, huge gigot or leg-of-mutton sleeves, high collar and long, full but smooth skirt. Tailoring was featured as was elaborate trimming with lace and braid. This outfit has a matching capelet.

Bearing a signature label from “C. Worth / Paris,” this gown was from the couture house of Charles Frederick Worth. The English-born designer opened his own firm in Paris in 1858 and soon rose to haute stature, creating fashionable garments for Empress Eugénie and other titled and wealthy women. Worth established the custom of sewing branded labels into his creations, was the first designer to show his garments on live models, and sold his designs to his customers rather than letting them dictate the design. All of this earned him the moniker, Father of Haute Couture. He was immensely popular with wealthy Americans as well as European royalty and aristocrats. Many clients travelled to Paris to purchase an entire wardrobe from the House of Worth.

Many beautiful couture garments came to The Charleston Museum from Gertrude Sanford Legendre, whose grandmothers were part of the Sanford (of Sanford, Florida) wealth and notoriety. This dress was worn by Sarah Jane Cochrane Sanford (Mrs. Stephen Sanford).

Want to see more 19th century dresses from our collection? Join us for a curator-led 19th Century Fashion History Tour on Friday, May 27th at 2:00!

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

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