Ghost
auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 
Missouri, c. 1890
Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 

Missouri, c. 1890

Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

charlestonmuseum:

Purple wool, velvet and lace two-piece Worth dress, c. 1890. The period was defined by the well-corseted waist, huge gigot or leg-of-mutton sleeves, high collar and long, full but smooth skirt. Tailoring was featured as was elaborate trimming with lace and braid. This outfit has a matching capelet.

Bearing a signature label from “C. Worth / Paris,” this gown was from the couture house of Charles Frederick Worth. The English-born designer opened his own firm in Paris in 1858 and soon rose to haute stature, creating fashionable garments for Empress Eugénie and other titled and wealthy women. Worth established the custom of sewing branded labels into his creations, was the first designer to show his garments on live models, and sold his designs to his customers rather than letting them dictate the design. All of this earned him the moniker, Father of Haute Couture. He was immensely popular with wealthy Americans as well as European royalty and aristocrats. Many clients travelled to Paris to purchase an entire wardrobe from the House of Worth.

Many beautiful couture garments came to The Charleston Museum from Gertrude Sanford Legendre, whose grandmothers were part of the Sanford (of Sanford, Florida) wealth and notoriety. This dress was worn by Sarah Jane Cochrane Sanford (Mrs. Stephen Sanford).

Want to see more 19th century dresses from our collection? Join us for a curator-led 19th Century Fashion History Tour on Friday, May 27th at 2:00!

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

charlestonmuseum:

This fabulous dress was made in Charleston by African American dressmaker, Pauline Seba, in 1890 for Charlestonian Sara C. Simonds. The styling is quite fashionable, the fabrics – rose satin and black lace – very bold.   Mrs. Seba must have been rather successful in her dressmaking, since she is one of few dressmakers at that time that actually labeled their garments. Our example has her stamped label inside on the inner waistband. It reads: “Mme. Seba / Robes / Charleston, S.C.” This gown was part of Miss Simonds’ trousseau, along with dresses made by J. Vauney of New York and Mme Ludinart of Paris.

Pauline Seba was listed in the Charleston City Directory as a dressmaker as early as 1887, working out of her home at 94 Anson Street. By 1893, she was listed at 122 Smith Street and was still at that address in the 1910 directory. Her husband, Charles, was listed as a postal carrier from 1873-1881, then a few other jobs such as fireman, cotton weigher, keeper at the Old Folks Home, fruiterer, wheelwright and finally a blacksmith by 1896.

Born around 1862, Pauline was very active in the community, being the president of the Union Millinery & Notion Company in 1915 and in 1916, a charter member of the Phyllis Wheatley Society, a social and literary group of African American women. She was also a charter member of the Charleston Chapter of the NAACP in 1919. And, she was obviously a very talented dressmaker!

This dress will be on exhibit March 10 - November 4, 2012 in Charleston Couture.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

After the Matinee by Armando Menocal, ca 1885-90 Spain or Cuba

After the Matinee by Armando Menocal, ca 1885-90 Spain or Cuba

Corset, 1890-95 England, the V&A Museum

Improvements in design, equipment and materials meant that corsets could mould the figure to suit the latest fashions. The straight busk on this corset creates a vertical line from bust to abdomen which complemented the less rounded, more angular silhouette of the 1890s. It was also supposed to relieve pressure on the internal organs while supporting the stomach. Shaped pieces (five on each side) have been seamed together and bust and hip gussets inserted to give the corset its distinctive shape. Strips of whalebone follow the contours of the hourglass silhouette, creating a rigid structure to emphasise the smallness of the waist. Each strip is enclosed in a bone channel formed by neat rows of machine stitching. The decorative embroidery stitches (flossing) visible towards the bottom and back of the corset prevent the whalebone from forcing its way out of these channels. A hook is attached at the centre front to prevent the petticoat from riding up and causing extra bulk at the waist.

Corset, 1890-95 England, the V&A Museum

Improvements in design, equipment and materials meant that corsets could mould the figure to suit the latest fashions. The straight busk on this corset creates a vertical line from bust to abdomen which complemented the less rounded, more angular silhouette of the 1890s. It was also supposed to relieve pressure on the internal organs while supporting the stomach. Shaped pieces (five on each side) have been seamed together and bust and hip gussets inserted to give the corset its distinctive shape. Strips of whalebone follow the contours of the hourglass silhouette, creating a rigid structure to emphasise the smallness of the waist. Each strip is enclosed in a bone channel formed by neat rows of machine stitching. The decorative embroidery stitches (flossing) visible towards the bottom and back of the corset prevent the whalebone from forcing its way out of these channels. A hook is attached at the centre front to prevent the petticoat from riding up and causing extra bulk at the waist.

fripperiesandfobs:

Caroline Harrison’s Evening Gown (by national museum of american history)

ca 1889-1893
Women’s housecoat, ca 1890 Japan, Les Arts Décoratifs
The museum doesn’t say whether this was made in Japan for the Western market, or if it was actually worn there.

Women’s housecoat, ca 1890 Japan, Les Arts Décoratifs

The museum doesn’t say whether this was made in Japan for the Western market, or if it was actually worn there.

Dress, 1888-92 France (Lyon), Les Arts Décoratifs
Evening coat by Worth, 1890 Paris, Shelburne Museum
I usually love anything by Worth (like a lot of you, it seems), but this one?  Maybe it’s just the picture, but idk.  Like eatoncrow said, the pattern makes it look like it’s covered in leeches.

Evening coat by Worth, 1890 Paris, Shelburne Museum

I usually love anything by Worth (like a lot of you, it seems), but this one?  Maybe it’s just the picture, but idk.  Like eatoncrow said, the pattern makes it look like it’s covered in leeches.

Cape, ca 1890 (textile made in 1860’s, originally a piano shawl)
Bid here

Cape, ca 1890 (textile made in 1860’s, originally a piano shawl)

Bid here

Wedding dress, 1890 NYC, the V&A Museum

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