Ghost
Woman’s dress in two parts by Jean-Philippe Worth, 1896 Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Midnight blue/black velvet 2-pc. dress (possibly for mourning) with large puffed-sleeve bodice and trained skirt

Woman’s dress in two parts by Jean-Philippe Worth, 1896 Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Midnight blue/black velvet 2-pc. dress (possibly for mourning) with large puffed-sleeve bodice and trained skirt

Mourning parasol, 1895-1900 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

A beautiful as well as large parasol, it is decidedly for mourning. This fact is evidenced by the hidden mourning crepe found in the middle layer between the taffeta and the densely ruched mousseline de soie. The handle is also extremely refined.

Mourning parasol, 1895-1900 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

A beautiful as well as large parasol, it is decidedly for mourning. This fact is evidenced by the hidden mourning crepe found in the middle layer between the taffeta and the densely ruched mousseline de soie. The handle is also extremely refined.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Photo of Bessie Emma Miller (1870-1931), sister-in-law of one of my great-uncles, ca 1895 US (North Carolina - Lincoln or Cabarrus County)

Photo of Bessie Emma Miller (1870-1931), sister-in-law of one of my great-uncles, ca 1895 US (North Carolina - Lincoln or Cabarrus County)

Robe by Liberty of London, ca 1897 London, the Victoria & Albert Museum



Object Type This garment with its full sleeves and long, flowing silhouette owes much of its inspiration to Pre-Raphaelite dress. The gown consists of a flared front panel attached to an open, flowing robe which falls from pleats at the back. The front panel has a patch pocket on the right side which is hidden by the deep plush edging.
Materials & Making The puffed sleeves, wide cuffs and velvet edgings are inspired by plain, loose 16th century gowns. The sunflower and pomegranate motif on the fabric was a recurring design on objects associated with the Aesthetic Movement. The subtle gold and brown tones were popular ‘artistic’ colours used in both dress and furnishing fabrics during the 1890s.
People Pre-Raphaelite painters had clothed their models in plain, loose dresses based on the forms of ‘early Medieval art’. The opening of Liberty’s dress department in 1884 helped popularise the taste for aesthetic dress. The Liberty designs which ranged from aesthetic gowns and children’s artistic dresses to more conventional ‘tea-gowns’ had a wide international appeal among the social elite.
Ownership & Use This type of dress was seen as the healthy and aesthetic alternative to the corseted and constrictive fashions in conventional dress. Before long it was not only those with artistic leanings who chose to wear garments which fit more loosely. By the early 20th century many fashionable dresses had a softer shoulder line and a more natural silhouette.

Robe by Liberty of London, ca 1897 London, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Object Type
This garment with its full sleeves and long, flowing silhouette owes much of its inspiration to Pre-Raphaelite dress. The gown consists of a flared front panel attached to an open, flowing robe which falls from pleats at the back. The front panel has a patch pocket on the right side which is hidden by the deep plush edging.

Materials & Making
The puffed sleeves, wide cuffs and velvet edgings are inspired by plain, loose 16th century gowns. The sunflower and pomegranate motif on the fabric was a recurring design on objects associated with the Aesthetic Movement. The subtle gold and brown tones were popular ‘artistic’ colours used in both dress and furnishing fabrics during the 1890s.

People
Pre-Raphaelite painters had clothed their models in plain, loose dresses based on the forms of ‘early Medieval art’. The opening of Liberty’s dress department in 1884 helped popularise the taste for aesthetic dress. The Liberty designs which ranged from aesthetic gowns and children’s artistic dresses to more conventional ‘tea-gowns’ had a wide international appeal among the social elite.

Ownership & Use
This type of dress was seen as the healthy and aesthetic alternative to the corseted and constrictive fashions in conventional dress. Before long it was not only those with artistic leanings who chose to wear garments which fit more loosely. By the early 20th century many fashionable dresses had a softer shoulder line and a more natural silhouette.

"Bunch of sweet peas" fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration No. 42.) The skirt of the rasse terre length, is made of white satin, and so is the full bodice, both entirely covered with sweet-pea stalks, tied in a bunch at the side, to form the girdle.  The flowers border the top of the bodice and constitute the sleeves, and a pretty satin hat is fashioned after the form of the flower.  Long gloves are ruffled on the arm, sweet peas figure on the fan, and black shoes and white silk stockings complete the costume.

"Bunch of sweet peas" fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration No. 42.) The skirt of the rasse terre length, is made of white satin, and so is the full bodice, both entirely covered with sweet-pea stalks, tied in a bunch at the side, to form the girdle.  The flowers border the top of the bodice and constitute the sleeves, and a pretty satin hat is fashioned after the form of the flower.  Long gloves are ruffled on the arm, sweet peas figure on the fan, and black shoes and white silk stockings complete the costume.

New Woman fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration, Fig. 29.) She wears a cloth tailor-made gown, and her bicycle is pourtrayed in front of it, together with the Sporting Times and her golf club; she carries her betting book and her latch-key at her side, her gun is slung across her shoulder, and her pretty Tam o’ Shanter is surmounted by a bicycle lamp.  She has gaiters to her patent leather shoes, and is armed at all points for conquest.

This girl CAN. NOT. BE. STOPPED!!

New Woman fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration, Fig. 29.) She wears a cloth tailor-made gown, and her bicycle is pourtrayed in front of it, together with the Sporting Times and her golf club; she carries her betting book and her latch-key at her side, her gun is slung across her shoulder, and her pretty Tam o’ Shanter is surmounted by a bicycle lamp.  She has gaiters to her patent leather shoes, and is armed at all points for conquest.

This girl CAN. NOT. BE. STOPPED!!

Edward IV period costume, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(1461-1883) The period is illustrated in Fig. 12 by a simple satin gown with revers of contrasting color, such as ruby with light pink; the head-dress of ruby velvet richly embroidered and jeweled.  A veil of lisse depending from each point and floating at the back.  The steeple-chase head-dresses were the particular feature of the day.  They are described as rolls of linen pointed like steeples, half an ell high, some having a wing at the side called butterflies; the cap was covered with lawn, which fell to the ground, and was tucked under the arm; many chains about the neck; velvet, silk, damask cloth of gold, costly furs, and striped materials, all worn.  The period was illustrated in the Health Exhibition of 1884 by a female figure taken from the King Rene Paris Library.  The skirt divided in two down the centre, with gold braid, each half subdivided into divisions of pink, or dark blue, gold or white satin, some having diagonal heraldic emblazoning in gold; gold belt round the waist where bodice ends; white chemisette with an upright plaiting at neck, and gold necklet; sleeves of pink satin, bordered with gold, tight blue ones beneath, forming a point on either side of the hand; stomacher of white satin crossed with gold; steeple head-dress in gold color, distended with wire, long veil to feet.

Edward IV period costume, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(1461-1883) The period is illustrated in Fig. 12 by a simple satin gown with revers of contrasting color, such as ruby with light pink; the head-dress of ruby velvet richly embroidered and jeweled.  A veil of lisse depending from each point and floating at the back.  The steeple-chase head-dresses were the particular feature of the day.  They are described as rolls of linen pointed like steeples, half an ell high, some having a wing at the side called butterflies; the cap was covered with lawn, which fell to the ground, and was tucked under the arm; many chains about the neck; velvet, silk, damask cloth of gold, costly furs, and striped materials, all worn.  The period was illustrated in the Health Exhibition of 1884 by a female figure taken from the King Rene Paris Library.  The skirt divided in two down the centre, with gold braid, each half subdivided into divisions of pink, or dark blue, gold or white satin, some having diagonal heraldic emblazoning in gold; gold belt round the waist where bodice ends; white chemisette with an upright plaiting at neck, and gold necklet; sleeves of pink satin, bordered with gold, tight blue ones beneath, forming a point on either side of the hand; stomacher of white satin crossed with gold; steeple head-dress in gold color, distended with wire, long veil to feet.

charlestonmuseum:

While these incredible shoes were not worn by the Wicked Witch of the West, she probably would have loved them. Labeled “The Livingston Shoe,” these bronzed leather lace-up beauties came from Charleston shoe retailer, Walter Francis Livingston (1874-1946).  He opened his store at 366 King Street in 1896 and these probably date to right around then. They have long, shallow pointed toes, curvaceous Louis heels and high front lacing over a tongue lined in lamb’s wool.

Bronzing refers to a process of treating the leather with red dye, originally cochineal and by the 1890s, an aniline dye imitation, to give it a metallic semi-iridescence.

Livingston remodeled his store in 1922 and opened a second store in Jacksonville Florida. In the 1921 Boot & Shoe Recorder, he was touted as using an aeroplane to advertise “the best advertised shoe sale ever held in the South.” Livingston himself went up as a passenger in the plane to drop circulars and advertisements over the Isle of Palms on Sunday, June 25. Among the flyers was a coupon for a free pair of shoes and $1 off coupons. He was often mentioned as having attended the Boston Style Show, bringing the latest styles and patterns to Charleston direct from the largest and most representative manufacturers.

Ladies’ skirts were still long in the 1890s, so probably just these pointed toes would appear. But, some of the more active fashions (walking outfits, business wear) saw skirts rising around the ankle, so these would have been perfect.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Sophie Hunter Colston by William Robinson Leigh, 1896

Sophie Hunter Colston by William Robinson Leigh, 1896

Evening dress, 1895-1899 London, the V&A Museum
Dress, ca 1897 France, Les Arts Décoratifs

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