Ghost
Marie Antoinette (1755–1793), Queen of France, in a Court Dress by François Hubert Drouais, 1773 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum


François Hubert Drouais (1727-1775) was born in Paris. He trained with his father, Hubert Drouais (1699-1767) and then with Donat Nonotte (1708-1785), Carle van Loo (1705-1765), Charles-Joseph Natoire (1700-1777) and François Boucher (1703-1770). He became a member of the Académie Royale in 1755 and achieved quickly a great success as a portrait painter, receiving prestigious commissions, especially from the court.
This painting is a portrait of the Dauphine Marie-Antoinette, consort of the future king of France, Louis XVI, at the age of 17. It depicts the princess in a lavish court dress adorned with sumptuous jewels. This portrait was used as a model for a tapestry made in the Royal manufactory of the Gobelins by the Cozette father and son in 1775. This portrait is a good example of French state portraits of the 18th century and the representation of an almighty royalty about to fail in a few years time.

Marie Antoinette (1755–1793), Queen of France, in a Court Dress by François Hubert Drouais, 1773 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

François Hubert Drouais (1727-1775) was born in Paris. He trained with his father, Hubert Drouais (1699-1767) and then with Donat Nonotte (1708-1785), Carle van Loo (1705-1765), Charles-Joseph Natoire (1700-1777) and François Boucher (1703-1770). He became a member of the Académie Royale in 1755 and achieved quickly a great success as a portrait painter, receiving prestigious commissions, especially from the court.

This painting is a portrait of the Dauphine Marie-Antoinette, consort of the future king of France, Louis XVI, at the age of 17. It depicts the princess in a lavish court dress adorned with sumptuous jewels. This portrait was used as a model for a tapestry made in the Royal manufactory of the Gobelins by the Cozette father and son in 1775. This portrait is a good example of French state portraits of the 18th century and the representation of an almighty royalty about to fail in a few years time.

(Source: BBC)

Series by Philippe Mercier, date not given (ca 1740’s-50’s?), Dumfries Museum

Young Woman with Bellows (Fire), from here

Young Woman with Scallop Shell (Water), from here

Young Woman with Verbena (Earth), from here

Young Woman with Goldfinch (Air), from here

Henrietta, Lady Jenkinson by Philippe Mercier, 1742, the Temple Newsam House
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Henrietta, Lady Jenkinson by Philippe Mercier, 1742, the Temple Newsam House

You have encountered A DOGE

Options:

PET DOGE

SNUGGLE DOGE

FEED DOGE

You have chosen PET DOGE

THE DOGE IS PLEASED

(Source: BBC)

Mourning band for George Washington, 1799 Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Mourning band for George Washington (d. 12/14/1799), white ribbon with painted design of urn inscribed “GW” in wreath, edged with black silk and covered with black silk crepe
Inscription
Written in ink of fabric label sewn to object: “Mourning Badge for George Washington. G.W. on urn. Probably worn by Wm. H. Sumner [1780-1861] 1799, son of Gov. [Increase] Sumner [1746-6/7/1799]”

Mourning band for George Washington, 1799 Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Mourning band for George Washington (d. 12/14/1799), white ribbon with painted design of urn inscribed “GW” in wreath, edged with black silk and covered with black silk crepe

Inscription

Written in ink of fabric label sewn to object: “Mourning Badge for George Washington. G.W. on urn. Probably worn by Wm. H. Sumner [1780-1861] 1799, son of Gov. [Increase] Sumner [1746-6/7/1799]”

Brooch, 1754 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum


Hair had long been important in sentimental jewellery, but during the 18th century it took on a new prominence. It could now form the centrepiece of a jewel, arranged in complicated motifs or as plain, woven sections. Tiny fragments of hair could even be incorporated into delicate paintings. Some designs were made by professionals, but many women chose to work the hair of loved ones themselves, using gum to secure their creations.
Hair jewels were worn to cherish the living as well as to remember the dead. The survival of many pieces celebrating love and friendship indicate their great social importance

Brooch, 1754 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Hair had long been important in sentimental jewellery, but during the 18th century it took on a new prominence. It could now form the centrepiece of a jewel, arranged in complicated motifs or as plain, woven sections. Tiny fragments of hair could even be incorporated into delicate paintings. Some designs were made by professionals, but many women chose to work the hair of loved ones themselves, using gum to secure their creations.

Hair jewels were worn to cherish the living as well as to remember the dead. The survival of many pieces celebrating love and friendship indicate their great social importance

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

Mourning ring, ca 1787 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This ring and its pair are inscribed ‘Cease thy tears, religion points on high/ CS ob.25 Jan 1787 aet 70/ IS ob. 18 Sep 1792 aet 72’.  They are mourning rings, possibly for a couple with the initials CS and IS who died aged 70 and 72. On the front of the ring, a vase of drooping gem-set flowers symbolises mourning.

Mourning ring, ca 1787 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This ring and its pair are inscribed ‘Cease thy tears, religion points on high/ CS ob.25 Jan 1787 aet 70/ IS ob. 18 Sep 1792 aet 72’.  They are mourning rings, possibly for a couple with the initials CS and IS who died aged 70 and 72. On the front of the ring, a vase of drooping gem-set flowers symbolises mourning.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

Une Tapissiere. Eine Tapesierin. (Upholsterer) by Martin Engelbrecht and Johann J Stelzer, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Une Tapissiere. Eine Tapesierin. (Upholsterer) by Martin Engelbrecht and Johann J Stelzer, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Ouvrier en Porcelaine. Ein Porcelain macher. (Porcelain maker) and Ouvriere en Porcelaine. Eine Porcelain macherin. (Porcelain maker’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

Un Cofretier. Ein Flaschner. (Tinsmith) and Une Cofretiere. Eine Flaschnerin. (Tinsmith’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

Un Peruquier. Ein Peruquenmacher. (Perukemaker) and Feme de Peruquier. Eine Peruquenmacherin. (Perukemaker’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

A perukemaker made wigs.

Here and here.

Un Tailleur. Ein Schneider. (Tailor) and Femme de Tailleur. Ein Schneiderin. (Tailor’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

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