Ghost
charlestonmuseum:

Black chiffon evening dress with silver lace bodice, c. 1920. The dress has a fashionable low waist and a stunning long train. The asymmetrical neckline is ornamented with applied pearls; the skirt is slit up the side to the lace and is trimmed with silver metallic braid. It was worn by the donor’s mother, Ethel Sanford (1873-1924, Mrs. John Sanford), international socialite, or possibly by the donor. The one-shouldered styling and the long train are probably the work of one of the period’s top designers, however the dress is unlabeled.Gift of Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1979At the time of the Legendre collection donation to The Charleston Museum, Cora Ginsburg was hired to appraise and identify the articles. Mrs. Ginsburg was one of the most respected authorities on antique textiles and clothing. Even after her death in 2003, the firm of Cora Ginsburg LLC is still one of the top in this field. Her comments on value and date of these items was most helpful to us for cataloging purposes. Regarding today’s black chiffon evening dress, Mrs. Ginsburg said “1920, unique”.
This gown is currently on exhibit in Charleston Couture.
TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

charlestonmuseum:

Black chiffon evening dress with silver lace bodice, c. 1920. The dress has a fashionable low waist and a stunning long train. The asymmetrical neckline is ornamented with applied pearls; the skirt is slit up the side to the lace and is trimmed with silver metallic braid. It was worn by the donor’s mother, Ethel Sanford (1873-1924, Mrs. John Sanford), international socialite, or possibly by the donor. The one-shouldered styling and the long train are probably the work of one of the period’s top designers, however the dress is unlabeled.

Gift of Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1979

At the time of the Legendre collection donation to The Charleston Museum, Cora Ginsburg was hired to appraise and identify the articles. Mrs. Ginsburg was one of the most respected authorities on antique textiles and clothing. Even after her death in 2003, the firm of Cora Ginsburg LLC is still one of the top in this field. Her comments on value and date of these items was most helpful to us for cataloging purposes. Regarding today’s black chiffon evening dress, Mrs. Ginsburg said “1920, unique”.

This gown is currently on exhibit in Charleston Couture.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

charlestonmuseum:

This elegant bronzed leather Colonial dress shoe, c. 1915,  has a decorative buckle and a high flaring tongue – both of which suggest a revival of the mid 18th century style. The “buckle” is ornamented with a silk ribbon and cut steel beading. The stylish Cuban heels are a bit higher and more delicate than in previous years. There is a single eyelet lacing under the tongue.

The right shoe is marked: Walkover Boot Shop, referring to manufacture by George E. Keith, a maker of fine shoes in the Campello section of Brockton, MA, who created the “Walk-Over” shoe. He was dedicated to making shoes fit better; in business he was progressive, up-to-date and perhaps even visionary in his factories and treatment of employees.

Keith worked in his father’s boot and shoe business as a youngster, and began business on his own with William S. Green in 1874. They separated in 1880, and Keith embarked on an even larger scale, becoming the foremost shoe manufacturing shoe concern in Massachusetts and perhaps the world.  His “Walkover” shoe was known the world over, with showrooms in many of the large cities of this country as well as branch offices in London, Melbourne, Cologne, Buenos Ayres and Santiago.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Photo of Jessie Abott, ca 1910
I can’t find anything about a Jessie Abott, but there was an American opera singer named Bessie Abott.  Typo, maybe?

Photo of Jessie Abott, ca 1910

I can’t find anything about a Jessie Abott, but there was an American opera singer named Bessie Abott.  Typo, maybe?

"Molly" Brown, possibly as she left RMS Carpathia, April 18th, 1912 or 1915.  I can’t tell because the listing at the Library of Congress says both.  Her clothing would be outdated for 1915, so I’m guessing the 1912 date is right.
Carpathia docked in New York at 9:30 PM EDT on April 18th.
If it was taken in 1912, this picture would have been taken by a reporter standing on Pier 54.  Behind him were 40,000 family members and curious onlookers.  Reporters were not allowed on Carpathia or the pilot ship, New York, that guided it into the harbor, but some were able to bribe their way around that rule.  One reporter for the St Louis Post-Dispatch even managed to get onto Carpathia itself as she came through the Hudson Bay and interview a few survivors before literally throwing what he wrote to a nearby tugboat sent by the paper’s owner.  Reporters who were more respectful of the rules but still desperate to get their story hovered around the ship in smaller boats and shouted questions.
Read more about how the Titanic story evolved in the news here.
100 years ago today, this very minute, Titanic had just slipped under the water.
EDIT: This was taken in 1912, but some time after the incident.  Still, what I described is what she would have experienced upon arriving in New York.

"Molly" Brown, possibly as she left RMS Carpathia, April 18th, 1912 or 1915.  I can’t tell because the listing at the Library of Congress says both.  Her clothing would be outdated for 1915, so I’m guessing the 1912 date is right.

Carpathia docked in New York at 9:30 PM EDT on April 18th.

If it was taken in 1912, this picture would have been taken by a reporter standing on Pier 54.  Behind him were 40,000 family members and curious onlookers.  Reporters were not allowed on Carpathia or the pilot ship, New York, that guided it into the harbor, but some were able to bribe their way around that rule.  One reporter for the St Louis Post-Dispatch even managed to get onto Carpathia itself as she came through the Hudson Bay and interview a few survivors before literally throwing what he wrote to a nearby tugboat sent by the paper’s owner.  Reporters who were more respectful of the rules but still desperate to get their story hovered around the ship in smaller boats and shouted questions.

Read more about how the Titanic story evolved in the news here.

100 years ago today, this very minute, Titanic had just slipped under the water.

EDIT: This was taken in 1912, but some time after the incident.  Still, what I described is what she would have experienced upon arriving in New York.

Fashion designer Lucile, Lady Duff-Gordon in a cutting-edge evening dress, 1910
The press portrayed Lucile and her husband as heartless aristocrats who bribed the crew in their lifeboat to ignore people freezing in the water after Titanic sank, supposedly because they were afraid that the lifeboat would be swamped.  This story is generally considered today to be the result of a couple checks taken in the wrong context.  Read more here.

Fashion designer Lucile, Lady Duff-Gordon in a cutting-edge evening dress, 1910

The press portrayed Lucile and her husband as heartless aristocrats who bribed the crew in their lifeboat to ignore people freezing in the water after Titanic sank, supposedly because they were afraid that the lifeboat would be swamped.  This story is generally considered today to be the result of a couple checks taken in the wrong context.  Read more here.

John and Nelle Snyder, Titanic survivors, the day they arrived in New York on Carpathia, April 18th, 1912
Their expressions are complex.  You can tell they’re feeling a combination of sadness, shock and relief.

John and Nelle Snyder, Titanic survivors, the day they arrived in New York on Carpathia, April 18th, 1912

Their expressions are complex.  You can tell they’re feeling a combination of sadness, shock and relief.

A hat found at the Titanic wreck site, ca 1912
100 years ago a couple minutes from now, this iceberg tore long gashes on the side (and possibly the bottom) of the Titanic.  It sank 375 miles south of Newfoundland at 1:20 AM EDT.
I saw this and all the other personal items when that big traveling exhibit was in Raleigh and it was just as sad as it was spooky.

A hat found at the Titanic wreck site, ca 1912

100 years ago a couple minutes from now, this iceberg tore long gashes on the side (and possibly the bottom) of the Titanic.  It sank 375 miles south of Newfoundland at 1:20 AM EDT.

I saw this and all the other personal items when that big traveling exhibit was in Raleigh and it was just as sad as it was spooky.

Ad for Rogers & Thompson Silks, 1910 New York

Ad for Rogers & Thompson Silks, 1910 New York

Day dresses, jacket and fashionable motifs, 1917 US, McCall’s Magazine
Couldn’t they have come up with a more flattering name for it than a “bowling pin skirt”?  It’s like a couple years ago when they were trying to bring back drop-crotch pants by calling them “carrot fit”.

Day dresses, jacket and fashionable motifs, 1917 US, McCall’s Magazine

Couldn’t they have come up with a more flattering name for it than a “bowling pin skirt”?  It’s like a couple years ago when they were trying to bring back drop-crotch pants by calling them “carrot fit”.

Day dresses, 1916 US, McCall’s Magazine

Button Theme