Ghost
Mourning hat by Bruat, Inc, ca 1915 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Black hats were popular for general wear in the 1910, particularly during the years of World War I, when sobriety and utility were the order of the day. Some hats, however, stand out specifically as mourning wear, suitable only to the bereaved, despite how chic the design might be. While this hat is fashionable in form and decoration, the unrelieved black clearly identifies its function. The choice of grape clusters - a normally colorful motif symbolizing fertility and abandon - produces an incongruous shock, thereby serving to strengthen the statement of mourning.

Mourning hat by Bruat, Inc, ca 1915 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Black hats were popular for general wear in the 1910, particularly during the years of World War I, when sobriety and utility were the order of the day. Some hats, however, stand out specifically as mourning wear, suitable only to the bereaved, despite how chic the design might be. While this hat is fashionable in form and decoration, the unrelieved black clearly identifies its function. The choice of grape clusters - a normally colorful motif symbolizing fertility and abandon - produces an incongruous shock, thereby serving to strengthen the statement of mourning.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Mourning hat by Henri Bendel, ca 1915 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This beautiful and stylish mourning hat from the World War I era was purchased from Henri Bendel, an important maker and importer of luxury goods. Its clean lines and elegant swath of scarf retain their sense of chic today. The single large buckle trim, a popular feature at time, has the weight and presence necessary to stand up to the severe color scheme and contrasting textures. Despite the timeless beauty of its design, this hat would have had a very limited wearability: the fabric of the scarf, a variety of crimped black crepe called “mourning crepe”, was used exclusively for mourning.

Mourning hat by Henri Bendel, ca 1915 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This beautiful and stylish mourning hat from the World War I era was purchased from Henri Bendel, an important maker and importer of luxury goods. Its clean lines and elegant swath of scarf retain their sense of chic today. The single large buckle trim, a popular feature at time, has the weight and presence necessary to stand up to the severe color scheme and contrasting textures. Despite the timeless beauty of its design, this hat would have had a very limited wearability: the fabric of the scarf, a variety of crimped black crepe called “mourning crepe”, was used exclusively for mourning.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

National Style Show models, 1914
Another shot:

National Style Show models, 1914

Another shot:

Mrs William Howard Taft (Helen “Nellie” Herron Taft), ca 1912-13 US
Another shot:

The necklace she’s wearing must have been a favorite.  She’s also wearing it in this portrait from 1909:

Mrs William Howard Taft (Helen “Nellie” Herron Taft), ca 1912-13 US

Another shot:

The necklace she’s wearing must have been a favorite.  She’s also wearing it in this portrait from 1909:

Prince and Princess Fushimi, ca early 1910’s Japan
This appears to be Prince Fushimi Hiroyasu (1875-1946) and Princess Tokugawa Tsuneko (1882-1939).

Prince and Princess Fushimi, ca early 1910’s Japan

This appears to be Prince Fushimi Hiroyasu (1875-1946) and Princess Tokugawa Tsuneko (1882-1939).

Mrs Edward B McLean, early 1910’s
Mary, Queen of England, 1914 UK

Mary, Queen of England, 1914 UK

Walking suit, ca 1914
Below:
(Left) Afternoon dress, ca 1917
(Right) Dress, ca 1918
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Walking suit, ca 1914

Below:

(Left) Afternoon dress, ca 1917

(Right) Dress, ca 1918

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Feb 28, 1914 Puck cover with an illustration by Nelson Greene, 1914 US
Some people in 1914 seemed to have been under the impression that the most fashionable women would dye or would soon be dying their hair outrageous colors to match the outrageous colors of their evening gowns.  I’m not sure where this idea came from, but I’ve seen it referenced in a number of cartoons from that year.
Also, I’d love to have a framed print of this.

Feb 28, 1914 Puck cover with an illustration by Nelson Greene, 1914 US

Some people in 1914 seemed to have been under the impression that the most fashionable women would dye or would soon be dying their hair outrageous colors to match the outrageous colors of their evening gowns.  I’m not sure where this idea came from, but I’ve seen it referenced in a number of cartoons from that year.

Also, I’d love to have a framed print of this.

Paquin race gown, 1914 France

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