Ghost
collective-history:

An Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaonic era princess’ crown.

I don’t normally post jewelry, crowns and the like, but this is GORGEOUS and the little gazelle heads are so cute.  I want it!
The 18th dynasty was ca 1550 BC-ca 1292 BC.  It included Tutankhamen (“King Tut”), Hatshepsut, Akhenaten and Nefertiti (his queen) among others.

collective-history:

An Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaonic era princess’ crown.

I don’t normally post jewelry, crowns and the like, but this is GORGEOUS and the little gazelle heads are so cute.  I want it!

The 18th dynasty was ca 1550 BC-ca 1292 BC.  It included Tutankhamen (“King Tut”), Hatshepsut, Akhenaten and Nefertiti (his queen) among others.

Saints Catherine and Mary Magdalene by Konrad Witz, ca 1440 Germany or Switzerland, Musée des Beaux-Arts (Strasbourg)

Saints Catherine and Mary Magdalene by Konrad Witz, ca 1440 Germany or Switzerland, Musée des Beaux-Arts (Strasbourg)

auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 
Missouri, c. 1890
Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

auntada:

Portrait of a young African American woman. 

Missouri, c. 1890

Burgess Studio, photographer

That’s one fantastic suit.

Portrait of a Woman by Apollon Mokritsky, 1841, Kaluga Art Museum
EDIT: Had to include this response by there-is-no-box because I thought it was great.
I almost scrolled past this, but something about it caught me off guard.
I think it’s her eyes. They’re looking straight at you and they’re not coy or modest or deferential. She’s looking straight at you; you, personally. And she looks like she’s thinking about something, something other than “here you may gaze at my beauty.” She just seems so active when women are so often portrayed as passive

Portrait of a Woman by Apollon Mokritsky, 1841, Kaluga Art Museum

EDIT: Had to include this response by there-is-no-box because I thought it was great.

I almost scrolled past this, but something about it caught me off guard.

I think it’s her eyes. They’re looking straight at you and they’re not coy or modest or deferential. She’s looking straight at you; you, personally. And she looks like she’s thinking about something, something other than “here you may gaze at my beauty.” She just seems so active when women are so often portrayed as passive

Evening dresses, 1928 UK, Woman’s Journal
Day and sport dresses, 1916 US, the Delineator
Walking and day dresses, 1916 US, the Delineator
Look at these fabulous ladies

Walking and day dresses, 1916 US, the Delineator

Look at these fabulous ladies

inspiringdresses:



Evening dress, 1805-10 UK (probably), the Met Museum
Click for more
The Fortune Teller, or Beware of a Dark Lady by Frank Cadogan Cowper, 1940 England, Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum

The Fortune Teller, or Beware of a Dark Lady by Frank Cadogan Cowper, 1940 England, Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum

Stays and busk, 1660’s England, the V&A Museum

Stays (a stiff corset) were essential garments in the fashionable woman’s wardrobe throughout the 17th century. Some sort of stiffening of a woman’s gown had been part of dress construction since the early 16th century. Sometimes it was added to the outer bodice; sometimes it was in the form of separate stays worn under the gown. Originally the stiffening served the purpose of preventing the expensive and elaborately decorated fabric of the gown from wrinkling. However, because stays could mould the female torso, they became essential for producing whatever shape was considered fashionable.

Stays and busk, 1660’s England, the V&A Museum

Stays (a stiff corset) were essential garments in the fashionable woman’s wardrobe throughout the 17th century. Some sort of stiffening of a woman’s gown had been part of dress construction since the early 16th century. Sometimes it was added to the outer bodice; sometimes it was in the form of separate stays worn under the gown. Originally the stiffening served the purpose of preventing the expensive and elaborately decorated fabric of the gown from wrinkling. However, because stays could mould the female torso, they became essential for producing whatever shape was considered fashionable.

Scuffs, 1850’s England, the V&A Museum

Button Theme