Ghost
Evening dress, ca 1925 France, the Met Museum
Shoes, ca 1790 UK (probably), the Met Museum
Evening dress, ca 1840 US, the Met Museum
Shoes, 1845-60 France (probably), the Met Museum
A rare example of extant day shoes from this era

Shoes, 1845-60 France (probably), the Met Museum

A rare example of extant day shoes from this era

Dinner dress by Mon. Vignon, 1878-79 Paris, the Met Museum
What a perfect dress!

Dinner dress by Mon. Vignon, 1878-79 Paris, the Met Museum

What a perfect dress!

Robe retroussée dans les poches, ca 1780 France, KCI

In accordance with the English custom of walks in the countryside and  relaxing in the open air, it became popular to dress up in clothes  derived from the work clothes and townwear of ordinary people, who, by  their nature, put great importance on freedom of movement. One of these  so inspired style is the “retroussée dans les poches”, as seen here. The  gown’s hem is pulled out from slits in either side, and draped on the  back. The red and white contrasting pekin stripes also heighten the  folds’ effect. “Pekin” stripes are textiles originally made in China of equal-width  striped patterns of differing colors and weaving methods. Along with the  expansion of interest in chinoiserie, around 1760, Peking striped  fabric was even produced in France and became popular. As Jean-Baptiste  Siméon Chardin(1699–1779) painted (“The Morning Toilette”, c.1741,  Nationalmuseum, Stockholm) , women of the rich bourgeoisie often wore  this kind of striped pattern.

I don’t care how many times I post this.

Robe retroussée dans les poches, ca 1780 France, KCI

In accordance with the English custom of walks in the countryside and relaxing in the open air, it became popular to dress up in clothes derived from the work clothes and townwear of ordinary people, who, by their nature, put great importance on freedom of movement. One of these so inspired style is the “retroussée dans les poches”, as seen here. The gown’s hem is pulled out from slits in either side, and draped on the back. The red and white contrasting pekin stripes also heighten the folds’ effect.
“Pekin” stripes are textiles originally made in China of equal-width striped patterns of differing colors and weaving methods. Along with the expansion of interest in chinoiserie, around 1760, Peking striped fabric was even produced in France and became popular. As Jean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin(1699–1779) painted (“The Morning Toilette”, c.1741, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm) , women of the rich bourgeoisie often wore this kind of striped pattern.

I don’t care how many times I post this.

Robe à la française, ca 1760 France?, KCI
A Playful Moment by Gustave Léonard de Jonghe, ca 1870’s
Bustles and cats: two of my favorite things

A Playful Moment by Gustave Léonard de Jonghe, ca 1870’s

Bustles and cats: two of my favorite things

Women’s military uniform by Abercrombie & Fitch, 1917 US, the Met Museum
Not WWII but I wanted to post it anyway.  Would you believe that A&F has been around since 1892?  They sold mostly sporting goods stuff before 1988 but still.
If you’re unfamiliar with the modern incarnation of the brand, this is everything they’ve sold since I first became aware of them in 2001:

Women’s military uniform by Abercrombie & Fitch, 1917 US, the Met Museum

Not WWII but I wanted to post it anyway.  Would you believe that A&F has been around since 1892?  They sold mostly sporting goods stuff before 1988 but still.

If you’re unfamiliar with the modern incarnation of the brand, this is everything they’ve sold since I first became aware of them in 2001:

Portrait of Aniela Radziwiłł by (missing artist), 1790’s-1800’s Poland, Nieborów Palace

Portrait of Aniela Radziwiłł by (missing artist), 1790’s-1800’s Poland, Nieborów Palace

ornamentedbeing:

House of Worth
circa 1867

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