Ghost
omgthatartifact:

The Landsdowne Artemis
Roman, 1st century BC- 1st century AD
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

omgthatartifact:

The Landsdowne Artemis

Roman, 1st century BC- 1st century AD

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

A bronze statue of Artemis wearing a chiton and a bust support with one strap crossing her chest, ca 100 BC

A bronze statue of Artemis wearing a chiton and a bust support with one strap crossing her chest, ca 100 BC

Reassembled headdress worn by a minor wife of Thutmose III, ca 1479-1425 BC Egypt, the Met Museum
I’m not sure if the hair is original

Reassembled headdress worn by a minor wife of Thutmose III, ca 1479-1425 BC Egypt, the Met Museum

I’m not sure if the hair is original

Reconstruction of a fragmented peplos found in the grave of the wealthy “Huldremose Woman”, ca 450 AD Denmark, National Museum of Denmark

Reconstruction of a fragmented peplos found in the grave of the wealthy “Huldremose Woman”, ca 450 AD Denmark, National Museum of Denmark

Trousers with attached socks, ca 4th century Germany, Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landesmuseum
Germanic and Celtic tribes wore leggings referred to as “trousers” that were initially looked down upon by the Greeks and Romans because they were worn by “barbarian” cultures.  Draped tunics were viewed as symbols of civilization, much like how we today might view a tuxedo vs overalls and no shirt.  Eventually, however, Romans in northern regions did adopt trousers for warmth.  They became accepted in part because trousers were also worn at the time by the Persians.  Loose trousers were worn under tunics in the Byzantine Empire.  The trousers in the picture above were found in the Thorsberg moor in Angeln, Germany.
Just a side note: These were probably put in the moor by themselves as a votive offering, not with a body attached to them.

Trousers with attached socks, ca 4th century Germany, Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landesmuseum

Germanic and Celtic tribes wore leggings referred to as “trousers” that were initially looked down upon by the Greeks and Romans because they were worn by “barbarian” cultures.  Draped tunics were viewed as symbols of civilization, much like how we today might view a tuxedo vs overalls and no shirt.  Eventually, however, Romans in northern regions did adopt trousers for warmth.  They became accepted in part because trousers were also worn at the time by the Persians.  Loose trousers were worn under tunics in the Byzantine Empire.  The trousers in the picture above were found in the Thorsberg moor in Angeln, Germany.

Just a side note: These were probably put in the moor by themselves as a votive offering, not with a body attached to them.

6th century Byzantine court dress by Stibbert, 19th century

6th century Byzantine court dress by Stibbert, 19th century

Caftan, 9th century Adygo-Alanian tribe (Northern Caucasus region of Russia), the State Hermitage Museum

Caftan, 9th century Adygo-Alanian tribe (Northern Caucasus region of Russia), the State Hermitage Museum

hatsfromhistory:

theancientworld:

Canopic Jar Lid, New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, late reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1340–1336 B.C.Egyptian; From KV55, Valley of the Kings, western ThebesEgyptian alabaster with glass and stone inlays 

Egyptian wigs are always something I’ve found fascinating.  This is a really lovely representation of one in a pretty stunning medium!  ALABASTER!

hatsfromhistory:

theancientworld:

Canopic Jar Lid, New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, late reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1340–1336 B.C.
Egyptian; From KV55, Valley of the Kings, western Thebes
Egyptian alabaster with glass and stone inlays

Egyptian wigs are always something I’ve found fascinating.  This is a really lovely representation of one in a pretty stunning medium!  ALABASTER!

Piece of a tapestry, ca 4th century AD Egypt, Victoria & Albert Museum
Classical motifs made it even to central Egypt, where this fragment was found.  In the East, classical influences have been found as far away as India!  The fragment depicts Perseus cutting off the head of Medusa.

Piece of a tapestry, ca 4th century AD Egypt, Victoria & Albert Museum

Classical motifs made it even to central Egypt, where this fragment was found.  In the East, classical influences have been found as far away as India!  The fragment depicts Perseus cutting off the head of Medusa.

Head of a Capitoline Venus displaying an ancient Greek or Roman hairstyle, 2nd century AD copy of a Greek original, the Louvre
Back:

Head of a Capitoline Venus displaying an ancient Greek or Roman hairstyle, 2nd century AD copy of a Greek original, the Louvre

Back:

Button Theme