Ghost
Adelina Patti by James Sant, ca 1886, National Portrait Gallery, London

The Italian opera singer Adelina Patti, the last of the line of great coloratura sopranos, made her London debut on 14 May 1861 at the Royal Italian Opera, Covent Garden, as Amina in Bellini’s La Sonnambula. In this and other roles, particularly that of Rosina in The Barber of Seville, she delighted audiences throughout Europe and in North and South America. Her public career lasted nearly sixty years and is virtually without parallel.

Adelina Patti by James Sant, ca 1886, National Portrait Gallery, London

The Italian opera singer Adelina Patti, the last of the line of great coloratura sopranos, made her London debut on 14 May 1861 at the Royal Italian Opera, Covent Garden, as Amina in Bellini’s La Sonnambula. In this and other roles, particularly that of Rosina in The Barber of Seville, she delighted audiences throughout Europe and in North and South America. Her public career lasted nearly sixty years and is virtually without parallel.

(Source: npg.org.uk)

Mrs John Prescott Knight and Her Children by John Prescott Knight, ca 1837 England, the Shire Hall Gallery

A portrait by the Stafford-born artist probably of his wife, Clarissa Isabella Knight (nee Hague,) and their two sons Albert Stanley (1832–1917) and Julian Miles (1835–1871).

Mrs John Prescott Knight and Her Children by John Prescott Knight, ca 1837 England, the Shire Hall Gallery

A portrait by the Stafford-born artist probably of his wife, Clarissa Isabella Knight (nee Hague,) and their two sons Albert Stanley (1832–1917) and Julian Miles (1835–1871).

(Source: BBC)

Mrs Richard Grainger, attributed to James Ramsay, ca 1827 UK, Laing Art Gallery

Mrs Richard Grainger, attributed to James Ramsay, ca 1827 UK, Laing Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

Miss Eliza O’Neill as Belvidera in Thomas Otway’s ‘Venice Preserved’ by Arthur William Devis, 1816-22, Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Miss Eliza O’Neill as Belvidera in Thomas Otway’s ‘Venice Preserved’ by Arthur William Devis, 1816-22, Wolverhampton Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

Portrait of a Lady by William Artaud, 1809, New Walk Museum & Art Gallery

Portrait of a Lady by William Artaud, 1809, New Walk Museum & Art Gallery

(Source: BBC)

Marie Antoinette (1755–1793), Queen of France, in a Court Dress by François Hubert Drouais, 1773 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum


François Hubert Drouais (1727-1775) was born in Paris. He trained with his father, Hubert Drouais (1699-1767) and then with Donat Nonotte (1708-1785), Carle van Loo (1705-1765), Charles-Joseph Natoire (1700-1777) and François Boucher (1703-1770). He became a member of the Académie Royale in 1755 and achieved quickly a great success as a portrait painter, receiving prestigious commissions, especially from the court.
This painting is a portrait of the Dauphine Marie-Antoinette, consort of the future king of France, Louis XVI, at the age of 17. It depicts the princess in a lavish court dress adorned with sumptuous jewels. This portrait was used as a model for a tapestry made in the Royal manufactory of the Gobelins by the Cozette father and son in 1775. This portrait is a good example of French state portraits of the 18th century and the representation of an almighty royalty about to fail in a few years time.

Marie Antoinette (1755–1793), Queen of France, in a Court Dress by François Hubert Drouais, 1773 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

François Hubert Drouais (1727-1775) was born in Paris. He trained with his father, Hubert Drouais (1699-1767) and then with Donat Nonotte (1708-1785), Carle van Loo (1705-1765), Charles-Joseph Natoire (1700-1777) and François Boucher (1703-1770). He became a member of the Académie Royale in 1755 and achieved quickly a great success as a portrait painter, receiving prestigious commissions, especially from the court.

This painting is a portrait of the Dauphine Marie-Antoinette, consort of the future king of France, Louis XVI, at the age of 17. It depicts the princess in a lavish court dress adorned with sumptuous jewels. This portrait was used as a model for a tapestry made in the Royal manufactory of the Gobelins by the Cozette father and son in 1775. This portrait is a good example of French state portraits of the 18th century and the representation of an almighty royalty about to fail in a few years time.

(Source: BBC)

Portrait of a Young Lady with a Plumed Headdress by British (English) School, 1633 England, Manchester City Galleries


A three-quarter, left side, portrait of a lady in a red embroidered dress with puffed sleeves, tied with yellow ribbon, and a lace collar. She wears a plumed headdress, which is trimmed with pearls and which sits near the back of her head.
A large pendant hangs around her neck with six black droplets hanging from the main section. A matching ring is tied to her collar with a piece of ribbon, while a ring is visible on the fourth finger of her left hand. Beaded bracelets adorn her wrist. She looks straight at the viewer, her face framed by her ringlets of dark hair. There is an oval painted frame with a dark background. Her age is documented in the top corner of the painting as ‘15’. This painting was probably made to celebrate the betrothal of her and her husband, who is represented in the accompanying painting entitled ‘A Gentleman’ which is executed in an identical style.

Portrait of a Young Lady with a Plumed Headdress by British (English) School, 1633 England, Manchester City Galleries

A three-quarter, left side, portrait of a lady in a red embroidered dress with puffed sleeves, tied with yellow ribbon, and a lace collar. She wears a plumed headdress, which is trimmed with pearls and which sits near the back of her head.

A large pendant hangs around her neck with six black droplets hanging from the main section. A matching ring is tied to her collar with a piece of ribbon, while a ring is visible on the fourth finger of her left hand. Beaded bracelets adorn her wrist. She looks straight at the viewer, her face framed by her ringlets of dark hair. There is an oval painted frame with a dark background. Her age is documented in the top corner of the painting as ‘15’. This painting was probably made to celebrate the betrothal of her and her husband, who is represented in the accompanying painting entitled ‘A Gentleman’ which is executed in an identical style.

(Source: BBC)

Portrait of a Lady (probably Mary Hungate), attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, ca 1620 England, Royal Albert Memorial Museum
This description is from here.

This painting and an earlier portrait were given by a descendant of the Browne family of Kiddington, Oxfordshire. Considering the apparent ages of the sitters and the dates of their costume, it is thought that they represent the two wives of Sir Henry Browne (c.1562-1628). This one probably depicts the later wife, Mary Hungate, about 1620. The full-length nature of the portrait, the fine detail and naturalistic setting are consistent with paintings by Marcus Geeraerts the younger. He had found significant success as court painter for Elizabeth I and then James I, significantly influencing Tudor and Jacobean portraiture.

Portrait of a Lady (probably Mary Hungate), attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, ca 1620 England, Royal Albert Memorial Museum

This description is from here.

This painting and an earlier portrait were given by a descendant of the Browne family of Kiddington, Oxfordshire. Considering the apparent ages of the sitters and the dates of their costume, it is thought that they represent the two wives of Sir Henry Browne (c.1562-1628). This one probably depicts the later wife, Mary Hungate, about 1620. The full-length nature of the portrait, the fine detail and naturalistic setting are consistent with paintings by Marcus Geeraerts the younger. He had found significant success as court painter for Elizabeth I and then James I, significantly influencing Tudor and Jacobean portraiture.

Portrait of an Unknown Lady, Aged 31, Holding a Glove and a Fan in the style of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1609, Nostell Priory

Portrait of an Unknown Lady, Aged 31, Holding a Glove and a Fan in the style of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1609, Nostell Priory

(Source: BBC)

Lady Frances Sidney (1531–1589), Countess of Sussex, Foundress of Sidney Sussex College by Steven van der Meulen, ca 1565 England, Sidney Sussex College (University of Cambridge)

Lady Frances Sidney (1531–1589), Countess of Sussex, Foundress of Sidney Sussex College by Steven van der Meulen, ca 1565 England, Sidney Sussex College (University of Cambridge)

(Source: BBC)

Lady Kytson by George Gower, 1573 England, Tate Britain

Elizabeth Cornwallis, Lady Kytson (c.1547-1628) married Sir Thomas Kytson (1541-1603), of Hengrave Hall in Suffolk in 1560. Of their three children, a son John died in infancy in 1562. Their elder daughter Margaret married Sir Charles Cavendish of Welbeck in 1582, but died in childbirth the same year. In 1583 their younger daughter - and sole heiress - married Thomas Darcy, later Earl Rivers, but separated from him in 1594.
In the present portrait, Lady Kytson wears the bright colours that had then just come into fashion, notably her red gown with its high-status fur collar. Her sleeves, beneath gauze oversleeves, are embroidered in black thread with roses, honeysuckle and carnations. She is probably dressed for outdoors, as she is wearing, rather than carrying, her gloves, as well as a tall, masculine hat with a jewelled band and linen undercap. The exact shape of this hat was only revealed when the painting was cleaned in 1995.
A payment in Kytson’s surviving accounts for 1573 indicates that this portrait, and its companion image of Sir Thomas Kytson (Tate N06090) were painted in London by George Gower (Cambridge University Library: Hengrave Papers 82 (3); cited in John Gage, The History and Antiquities of Hengrave, London 1822, p.40). The Kytsons had a town house in Coleman Street, in the City of London.
These are the earliest extant works by Gower and, together with his Self-portrait of 1579 (private collection; see Dynasties, cat. no. 57), form a nucleus upon which further attributions to him have been based.
Nothing is known of Gower’s training but he was descended from a Yorkshire gentry family. In 1581 he was appointed Serjeant Painter to Queen Elizabeth, the premier royal post for an artist, but one whose duties generally involved the control of applied and decorative painting for the monarch. In 1584 a patent was drafted that would have granted Gower the monopoly of all painted and engraved portraits of the Queen (while allowing another painter, Nicholas Hilliard, the monopoly of her portraits in miniature) but it is not clear whether this was ever enacted. Nevertheless, Gower seem to have been one of the most fashionable portraitists of the 1570s-1580s.

Lady Kytson by George Gower, 1573 England, Tate Britain

Elizabeth Cornwallis, Lady Kytson (c.1547-1628) married Sir Thomas Kytson (1541-1603), of Hengrave Hall in Suffolk in 1560. Of their three children, a son John died in infancy in 1562. Their elder daughter Margaret married Sir Charles Cavendish of Welbeck in 1582, but died in childbirth the same year. In 1583 their younger daughter - and sole heiress - married Thomas Darcy, later Earl Rivers, but separated from him in 1594.

In the present portrait, Lady Kytson wears the bright colours that had then just come into fashion, notably her red gown with its high-status fur collar. Her sleeves, beneath gauze oversleeves, are embroidered in black thread with roses, honeysuckle and carnations. She is probably dressed for outdoors, as she is wearing, rather than carrying, her gloves, as well as a tall, masculine hat with a jewelled band and linen undercap. The exact shape of this hat was only revealed when the painting was cleaned in 1995.

A payment in Kytson’s surviving accounts for 1573 indicates that this portrait, and its companion image of Sir Thomas Kytson (Tate N06090) were painted in London by George Gower (Cambridge University Library: Hengrave Papers 82 (3); cited in John Gage, The History and Antiquities of Hengrave, London 1822, p.40). The Kytsons had a town house in Coleman Street, in the City of London.

These are the earliest extant works by Gower and, together with his Self-portrait of 1579 (private collection; see Dynasties, cat. no. 57), form a nucleus upon which further attributions to him have been based.

Nothing is known of Gower’s training but he was descended from a Yorkshire gentry family. In 1581 he was appointed Serjeant Painter to Queen Elizabeth, the premier royal post for an artist, but one whose duties generally involved the control of applied and decorative painting for the monarch. In 1584 a patent was drafted that would have granted Gower the monopoly of all painted and engraved portraits of the Queen (while allowing another painter, Nicholas Hilliard, the monopoly of her portraits in miniature) but it is not clear whether this was ever enacted. Nevertheless, Gower seem to have been one of the most fashionable portraitists of the 1570s-1580s.

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