Ghost
Mrs John Prescott Knight and Her Children by John Prescott Knight, ca 1837 England, the Shire Hall Gallery

A portrait by the Stafford-born artist probably of his wife, Clarissa Isabella Knight (nee Hague,) and their two sons Albert Stanley (1832–1917) and Julian Miles (1835–1871).

Mrs John Prescott Knight and Her Children by John Prescott Knight, ca 1837 England, the Shire Hall Gallery

A portrait by the Stafford-born artist probably of his wife, Clarissa Isabella Knight (nee Hague,) and their two sons Albert Stanley (1832–1917) and Julian Miles (1835–1871).

(Source: BBC)

A Child with a Rattle, attributed to Paulus van Somer I, 1611, the Temple Newsam House

A Child with a Rattle, attributed to Paulus van Somer I, 1611, the Temple Newsam House

(Source: BBC)

Child’s mourning dress, 1844 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Child’s mourning dress, 1844 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Child’s mourning garment, ca 1882 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Little girl’s mourning garment, in the form of a short princess-line coat dress made of black grosgrain lined throughout with white cotton. The garment has a rounded neck with a self fabric neckband, and fastens the length of the front with metal hooks and stitched loops. The hem and wrist-length sleeves are finished with vandyke tabs bound and faced with self fabric. The coat is shaped to fit at the waist: it is cut in six pieces, the front two of which have long darts. Lines of stitch holes indicate that two mitred pieces of fabric which were originally positioned at the waist back have been removed.

Child’s mourning garment, ca 1882 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

Little girl’s mourning garment, in the form of a short princess-line coat dress made of black grosgrain lined throughout with white cotton. The garment has a rounded neck with a self fabric neckband, and fastens the length of the front with metal hooks and stitched loops. The hem and wrist-length sleeves are finished with vandyke tabs bound and faced with self fabric. The coat is shaped to fit at the waist: it is cut in six pieces, the front two of which have long darts. Lines of stitch holes indicate that two mitred pieces of fabric which were originally positioned at the waist back have been removed.

(Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

The Quilting Frolic by John Lewis Krimmel, 1813 Philadelphia, Winterthur Museum

The Quilting Frolic by John Lewis Krimmel, 1813 Philadelphia, Winterthur Museum

Portraits by Jacob Maentel and an unknown American artist, ca 1810-25, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library

I’m actually kind of baffled by the rooster in the boy’s portrait.

Boy’s robe, ca 1750 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This boy’s robe dates from a era when young boys in Europe wore garments with skirts, a custom with unclear origins, but which most likely had to do with making it easier for them to urinate. The style was common until about 1920. A boy usually received his first breeches or trousers between four and seven years of age, sometimes in a special ceremony held by the family.

Boy’s robe, ca 1750 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This boy’s robe dates from a era when young boys in Europe wore garments with skirts, a custom with unclear origins, but which most likely had to do with making it easier for them to urinate. The style was common until about 1920. A boy usually received his first breeches or trousers between four and seven years of age, sometimes in a special ceremony held by the family.

Portrait of a Young Girl by Anthony van Dyck, unknown date (ca 1630’s?), private collection

Portrait of a Young Girl by Anthony van Dyck, unknown date (ca 1630’s?), private collection

A Lady in a Garden taking Coffee with some Children by Nicolas Lancret, 1742 (probably), The National Gallery (London)
Click for a large image

This painting, one of Lancret’s most ambitious of the works and often considered his masterpiece, was exhibited at the Salon of 1742. The subject is a pastoral idyll in contemporary dress. It may have been intended as a portrait of a particular family taking its ease in the kind of idealised park setting popularised by prints after the paintings of Watteau.
Informality is the keynote of both the landscape and the figures, who occupy the left part of the composition. A woman, presumably the mother, offers a spoonful of coffee to the younger child, observed by a man (presumably the father) who holds out a tray to a servant holding a silver coffee pot. The traditional title of the painting, ‘The Cup of Chocolate’ is, therefore, a misnomer. Behind the mother is the focal point of the setting, a stone vase filled with roses on an elaborate pedestal, which forms the left pier of the fountain basin to the right. The informality of the scene is underlined by the doll lying on the ground beside the fountain and the dog on the right rooting among the hollyhocks.

A Lady in a Garden taking Coffee with some Children by Nicolas Lancret, 1742 (probably), The National Gallery (London)

Click for a large image

This painting, one of Lancret’s most ambitious of the works and often considered his masterpiece, was exhibited at the Salon of 1742. The subject is a pastoral idyll in contemporary dress. It may have been intended as a portrait of a particular family taking its ease in the kind of idealised park setting popularised by prints after the paintings of Watteau.

Informality is the keynote of both the landscape and the figures, who occupy the left part of the composition. A woman, presumably the mother, offers a spoonful of coffee to the younger child, observed by a man (presumably the father) who holds out a tray to a servant holding a silver coffee pot. The traditional title of the painting, ‘The Cup of Chocolate’ is, therefore, a misnomer. Behind the mother is the focal point of the setting, a stone vase filled with roses on an elaborate pedestal, which forms the left pier of the fountain basin to the right. The informality of the scene is underlined by the doll lying on the ground beside the fountain and the dog on the right rooting among the hollyhocks.

Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon
Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

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