Ghost
Formal dress, 1770’s France (made of Chinese silk), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Louis XVI-style formal dress and petticoat of Chinese white silk with polychrome painted serpentine floral motifs. Robe: round neckline trimmed with pleated ruffle and cording, fitted bodice, sack (Watteau) back with two panels of pleats, elbow length fitted sleeves with double asymmetrical ruffles trimmed as neckline, moderate panier accomodating skirt with fullness pleated over pnaier into V-front natural waistline, front panels trimmed with ruffled ruching and corded trim; white linen bodice and sleeve linings. Underskirt: appliqued ruffled ruching on front, drawstrings at waist. 3 trimmed bows. Panel of same fabric. (Cf. 43.1633)

Formal dress, 1770’s France (made of Chinese silk), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Louis XVI-style formal dress and petticoat of Chinese white silk with polychrome painted serpentine floral motifs. Robe: round neckline trimmed with pleated ruffle and cording, fitted bodice, sack (Watteau) back with two panels of pleats, elbow length fitted sleeves with double asymmetrical ruffles trimmed as neckline, moderate panier accomodating skirt with fullness pleated over pnaier into V-front natural waistline, front panels trimmed with ruffled ruching and corded trim; white linen bodice and sleeve linings. Underskirt: appliqued ruffled ruching on front, drawstrings at waist. 3 trimmed bows. Panel of same fabric. (Cf. 43.1633)

Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon
Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

Louis Joseph Xavier François of France and Marie Thérèse Charlotte of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, 1784 France, Musée National des Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

Click for a bigger image - Not found at the source because of Joconde’s notoriously awful image quality.

Madame Élisabeth de France (1764–1794) by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, ca 1787 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Madame Élisabeth de France (1764–1794) by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, ca 1787 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Princess Élisabeth of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, ca 1782 France, Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon
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Princess Élisabeth of France by Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, ca 1782 France, Châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

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A Treat for her Pet by Guillaume Dubufe, 1871 France, private collection
I really want a bird but I’ll never have one because I’ll always have a cat. :(

A Treat for her Pet by Guillaume Dubufe, 1871 France, private collection

I really want a bird but I’ll never have one because I’ll always have a cat. :(

Louise, Duchess of Devonshire’s ‘Queen of Zenobia’ Ball Gown for the Devonshire House Ball by House of Worth, 1897 Paris (worn in England), Chatsworth


Ball gown with an under-robe of cloth of silver, wrought all over with silver thread and brilliants, and with an over-dress of green and gold shot-silk gauze, embroidered to the waist with green and gold metalwork, decorated with jewels. A long train of turquoise velvet, embroidered in gold to an oriental design, was attached to the shoulders. A bodice of gold cloth and lace was fitted over a whalebone corset into which her waist was tightly laced. The headdress that went with it has not survived, but it can be seen in Lafayette’s photograph.
The dress was made for Louise, Duchess of Devonshire by the House of Worth to wear at the celebrated Diamond Jubilee Ball at Devonshire House. It was a fancy dress ball and Louise attended as Queen Zenobia, the warrior Queen of Palmyra. The Duchess may have got the idea for the theme of the dress from Inigo Jones’s costume designs for Court Masques that are in the drawing collections at Chatsworth.

Unfortunately, the images are really small.

Louise, Duchess of Devonshire’s ‘Queen of Zenobia’ Ball Gown for the Devonshire House Ball by House of Worth, 1897 Paris (worn in England), Chatsworth

Ball gown with an under-robe of cloth of silver, wrought all over with silver thread and brilliants, and with an over-dress of green and gold shot-silk gauze, embroidered to the waist with green and gold metalwork, decorated with jewels. A long train of turquoise velvet, embroidered in gold to an oriental design, was attached to the shoulders. A bodice of gold cloth and lace was fitted over a whalebone corset into which her waist was tightly laced. The headdress that went with it has not survived, but it can be seen in Lafayette’s photograph.

The dress was made for Louise, Duchess of Devonshire by the House of Worth to wear at the celebrated Diamond Jubilee Ball at Devonshire House. It was a fancy dress ball and Louise attended as Queen Zenobia, the warrior Queen of Palmyra. The Duchess may have got the idea for the theme of the dress from Inigo Jones’s costume designs for Court Masques that are in the drawing collections at Chatsworth.

Unfortunately, the images are really small.

La Soirée by Jean Béraud, ca 1880 France, Musée Carnavalet

La Soirée by Jean Béraud, ca 1880 France, Musée Carnavalet

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

La pâtisserie Gloppe (6, avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème arrondissement, Paris) by Jean Béraud, 1889 Paris, Musée Carnavalet

fantomas-en-cavale:

L’Art et la Mode, 1921

"The old costumes of our provinces inspire us with new ideas"
Left to right: Berichon (from Berry, a former region in central France), Breton (from Brittany) and Alsatian (from Alsace)
I think these are supposed to be modern interpretations of traditional provincial dress, shown in a more accurate way in the bottom left corner.

fantomas-en-cavale:

L’Art et la Mode, 1921

"The old costumes of our provinces inspire us with new ideas"

Left to right: Berichon (from Berry, a former region in central France), Breton (from Brittany) and Alsatian (from Alsace)

I think these are supposed to be modern interpretations of traditional provincial dress, shown in a more accurate way in the bottom left corner.

January fancy dress, 1877 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

January fancy dress, 1877 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

Court dress (robe à la française and petticoat) in four parts, 1770’s France, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Court dress (robe à la française and petticoat) in four parts, 1770’s France, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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