Ghost
Mrs Elizabeth Wurtz Elder and Her Three Children by Jacob Eichholtz, 1825 US (Philadelphia?), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
I can’t get over how cute that fur bonnet is.  I’m just going to pretend that it’s faux fur, even though it didn’t exist yet.

Mrs Elizabeth Wurtz Elder and Her Three Children by Jacob Eichholtz, 1825 US (Philadelphia?), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

I can’t get over how cute that fur bonnet is.  I’m just going to pretend that it’s faux fur, even though it didn’t exist yet.

Elizabeth, Countess of Warwick by Sir Joshua Reynolds, ca 1780 England, the Frick Collection
Giant image

Elizabeth, Countess of Warwick by Sir Joshua Reynolds, ca 1780 England, the Frick Collection

Giant image

Hat from JW Robinson Co, ca 1917 US (Los Angeles), FIDM Museum & Galleries
Day dress from Harvey Nichols, ca 1916 London, FIDM Museum & Galleries
JW Robinson Co (usually called “Robinson’s) was a department store chain headquartered in Los Angeles, with locations across Southern California, Arizona and the Gulf Coast of Florida.  It was founded in 1881 and closed in 1991.
Harvey Nichols is a department store chain with locations in London, Leeds, Edinburgh, Birmingham, Manchester, Bristol, Dublin, Riyadh, Kuwait and Hong Kong.  The company was founded by Benjamin Harvey in 1831 as a linen store.  When he died the shop was passed on to his daughter, who entered into a partnership with Colonel Nichols, who sold luxury items such as oriental rugs and silk.  The current London flagship was opened in 1880 and added on to in 1932.  I don’t think they sell dresses like this today, but they totally should.

Hat from JW Robinson Co, ca 1917 US (Los Angeles), FIDM Museum & Galleries

Day dress from Harvey Nichols, ca 1916 London, FIDM Museum & Galleries


JW Robinson Co (usually called “Robinson’s) was a department store chain headquartered in Los Angeles, with locations across Southern California, Arizona and the Gulf Coast of Florida.  It was founded in 1881 and closed in 1991.

Harvey Nichols is a department store chain with locations in London, Leeds, Edinburgh, Birmingham, Manchester, Bristol, Dublin, Riyadh, Kuwait and Hong Kong.  The company was founded by Benjamin Harvey in 1831 as a linen store.  When he died the shop was passed on to his daughter, who entered into a partnership with Colonel Nichols, who sold luxury items such as oriental rugs and silk.  The current London flagship was opened in 1880 and added on to in 1932.  I don’t think they sell dresses like this today, but they totally should.

(Source: blog.fidmmuseum.org)

April bonnets, 1877 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

April bonnets, 1877 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

April bonnets, 1875 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

April bonnets, 1875 France, Journal des Demoiselles et Petit Courrier des Dames Réunis

collective-history:

An Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaonic era princess’ crown.

I don’t normally post jewelry, crowns and the like, but this is GORGEOUS and the little gazelle heads are so cute.  I want it!
The 18th dynasty was ca 1550 BC-ca 1292 BC.  It included Tutankhamen (“King Tut”), Hatshepsut, Akhenaten and Nefertiti (his queen) among others.

collective-history:

An Egyptian 18th dynasty pharaonic era princess’ crown.

I don’t normally post jewelry, crowns and the like, but this is GORGEOUS and the little gazelle heads are so cute.  I want it!

The 18th dynasty was ca 1550 BC-ca 1292 BC.  It included Tutankhamen (“King Tut”), Hatshepsut, Akhenaten and Nefertiti (his queen) among others.

Euphemia White Van Rensselear by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1842 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Euphemia White Van Rensselear by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1842 US, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

(Source: metmuseum.org)

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
Continued from here:

[The remainder of the] garment is of black silk Armure.  Two additional beaded panels separate the pleated side-pieces from the puffed back.  The loose sleeves are of the armure, and a handsome jet passementerie borders the panels.  The bonnet worn with this mantle is a capote with high, puffed silk crown, and gathered front of black velvet.  The only trimming is a shaded bunch of cardinal ostrich-tips.  To the right in the same illustration is a stylish costume of deep wine-colored gros-grain.  The pleated skirt has a high, full drapery at the back.  The casaque, coming low over the hips, is trimmed with bands of wine-colored silk braid, threaded slightly with gold.  Each band terminates in a double-loop.  The skirt draper is carried to the waist-line in the back, hiding that portion of the casaque.  There is a high braided collar and cuffs.  The hat of silver-gray felt is trimmed with shaded cardinal ribbon.
Bourettes and boucle cloths, and all others with a rough surface are in demand for street dresses.  A new material has a dark surface thickly sprinkled with large tri-colored balls, in the Eastern shades.  This is rather striking in in effect, and it is used only for panels and trimming, in conjunction with plain goods.
Astrakhan is another trimming that will be extensively used in the same manner.  It comes in black and brown shades, and is greatly reduced in price this season.
There is a rage for rich garnitures this winter and many new and elegant novelties are in the market.  Bands of chenille, the broader the handsomer, are thickly studded with jet, or covered with balls or drooping pendants of chenille.  One especially artistic pattern, is a series of autumn leaves, made of twisted silk, from which hang beaded acorns.
There is an endless assortment of beads, new both in shape and color.  There are the spear-head beads, the dumb-bell-shaped beads, the lance-pointed beads, the triangular beads, and a dozen more odd shapes.  They come in jet of various colors, steel, crystal, wood, silver, gold, and pearl.
These novelty trimming command high prices, but an advantage is that they are made of the very best materials; no inferior silk is used, and none but the finest grades of jet.  These are said to afford the manufacturers quite as much profit; and the trade certainly more satisfaction.
Shown at Figure No. 6, is a home-dress of gray faille, mixed with a shaded gray stamped cashmere.  A pleating of faille borders the square-train.  The figured cashmere forms the double drapery in front, ornamented with twisted silk fringe.  There is a pointed shirred plastron inserted in the lower drapery; the same forms the vest in the square-cut bodice, and also the pointed piece in the back.  The bodice is pointed over the hips, finished with fringe, and a triple fold of the plain material.  The back drapery is of faille, very slightly looped.
Many ladies find a plain round skirt of velvet, velveteen, or corduroy, quite indispensable for winter.  They are finished simply with plissés of the same, and almost any description of overskirt can be worn with them.  Black and brown are the most serviceable colors.
Many of the richest walking-dresses and afternoon reception toilettes are made of velvet, in the dark shades of blue, brown, and gray; all other colors are reserved strictly for evening wear.  Every winter there is a strong effort to popularize the various purple tints; an effort that is never attended with much success.  Very few shades of purple are either becoming or pretty.  They all lack warmth; and under gas-light the pale purple shades become heavy and dingy.  Purple is never a very safe color; and when it is chosen, it is always a wise precaution to examine it first in the sunlight, and then under a strong gas-light.
At Figure No. 7, is a dark gray velveteen costume, the skirt run with bands of silver braid.  The velveteen tunic is carried high on the left side, and is puffed on the hips.  The back drapery is also high.  The waist is pointed back and front, and is trimmed with a plain plastron and revers, striped with silver.  The cuffs are the same.  The pointed bonnet is of gray felt, trimmed with a bunch of gray and crimson feathers.  The strings are of serviceable velvet, crimson and gray.
Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines… (continued)

The paragraph about colors is bolded because it reflects color trends in the mid-1880’s.  Purple was very popular in the late 1860’s, but by this time it was considered ugly and risky to wear.  Also, it’s interesting to see the tip they give about checking colors both outdoors in sunlight and indoors in gaslight.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

Continued from here:

[The remainder of the] garment is of black silk Armure.  Two additional beaded panels separate the pleated side-pieces from the puffed back.  The loose sleeves are of the armure, and a handsome jet passementerie borders the panels.  The bonnet worn with this mantle is a capote with high, puffed silk crown, and gathered front of black velvet.  The only trimming is a shaded bunch of cardinal ostrich-tips.  To the right in the same illustration is a stylish costume of deep wine-colored gros-grain.  The pleated skirt has a high, full drapery at the back.  The casaque, coming low over the hips, is trimmed with bands of wine-colored silk braid, threaded slightly with gold.  Each band terminates in a double-loop.  The skirt draper is carried to the waist-line in the back, hiding that portion of the casaque.  There is a high braided collar and cuffs.  The hat of silver-gray felt is trimmed with shaded cardinal ribbon.

Bourettes and boucle cloths, and all others with a rough surface are in demand for street dresses.  A new material has a dark surface thickly sprinkled with large tri-colored balls, in the Eastern shades.  This is rather striking in in effect, and it is used only for panels and trimming, in conjunction with plain goods.

Astrakhan is another trimming that will be extensively used in the same manner.  It comes in black and brown shades, and is greatly reduced in price this season.

There is a rage for rich garnitures this winter and many new and elegant novelties are in the market.  Bands of chenille, the broader the handsomer, are thickly studded with jet, or covered with balls or drooping pendants of chenille.  One especially artistic pattern, is a series of autumn leaves, made of twisted silk, from which hang beaded acorns.

There is an endless assortment of beads, new both in shape and color.  There are the spear-head beads, the dumb-bell-shaped beads, the lance-pointed beads, the triangular beads, and a dozen more odd shapes.  They come in jet of various colors, steel, crystal, wood, silver, gold, and pearl.

These novelty trimming command high prices, but an advantage is that they are made of the very best materials; no inferior silk is used, and none but the finest grades of jet.  These are said to afford the manufacturers quite as much profit; and the trade certainly more satisfaction.

Shown at Figure No. 6, is a home-dress of gray faille, mixed with a shaded gray stamped cashmere.  A pleating of faille borders the square-train.  The figured cashmere forms the double drapery in front, ornamented with twisted silk fringe.  There is a pointed shirred plastron inserted in the lower drapery; the same forms the vest in the square-cut bodice, and also the pointed piece in the back.  The bodice is pointed over the hips, finished with fringe, and a triple fold of the plain material.  The back drapery is of faille, very slightly looped.

Many ladies find a plain round skirt of velvet, velveteen, or corduroy, quite indispensable for winter.  They are finished simply with plissés of the same, and almost any description of overskirt can be worn with them.  Black and brown are the most serviceable colors.

Many of the richest walking-dresses and afternoon reception toilettes are made of velvet, in the dark shades of blue, brown, and gray; all other colors are reserved strictly for evening wear.  Every winter there is a strong effort to popularize the various purple tints; an effort that is never attended with much success.  Very few shades of purple are either becoming or pretty.  They all lack warmth; and under gas-light the pale purple shades become heavy and dingy.  Purple is never a very safe color; and when it is chosen, it is always a wise precaution to examine it first in the sunlight, and then under a strong gas-light.

At Figure No. 7, is a dark gray velveteen costume, the skirt run with bands of silver braid.  The velveteen tunic is carried high on the left side, and is puffed on the hips.  The back drapery is also high.  The waist is pointed back and front, and is trimmed with a plain plastron and revers, striped with silver.  The cuffs are the same.  The pointed bonnet is of gray felt, trimmed with a bunch of gray and crimson feathers.  The strings are of serviceable velvet, crimson and gray.

Very charming indeed, are some of the latest house-dresses, or tea-gowns, as the most elaborate of them are called.  A fanciful one is made of pale-pink surah, the point literally covered with waves of écru, Malines… (continued)

The paragraph about colors is bolded because it reflects color trends in the mid-1880’s.  Purple was very popular in the late 1860’s, but by this time it was considered ugly and risky to wear.  Also, it’s interesting to see the tip they give about checking colors both outdoors in sunlight and indoors in gaslight.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly
The wedding dress described on this page is here.
Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.
A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.
A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.
Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.
The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.
Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.
To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".
I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

A “Fashion Gossip” column describing cutting edge Philadelphia fashions, Winter 1885-86 US (Philadelphia), Strawbridge and Clothier’s Quarterly

The wedding dress described on this page is here.

Continued from here:

[The] handsome wedding-costume shown in the full-page illustration has a robe front of pleatings of old Mechlin lace.  Over this front petticoat comes the full court-train of cream-white satin de Lyon, draped full and high on each hip, and falling in deep, heavy pleats in the back.  A pleating of lace is placed around the bottom of the waist, and a plastron of the same, ornaments the front.  Over the whole costume falls the veil of sheer Brussels net.  The veil is gathered on the crown of the head with a small cluster of orange blossoms.  The bridal bouquet is composed of nephetos-buds, intermingled with sprays of orange-blossoms, and adds to the general effect.

A popular floral decoration for weddings is a Japanese umbrella, made of white flowers, under which the bride and groom stand while receiving congratulations.  A wish-bone is another novel fancy; this is usually suspended in the doorway between two parlors.

A neat style of making a plush or velvet jacket is shown at Figure No. 3.  It is a model that will be found particularly becoming to slender figures.  The material is seal-brown plush; and is cut double-pointed in front, and is embroidered, vest-fashion, in shaded gold braid.  From the side-seams, simulating an outer short jacket, come two side revers.  The sleeves are fulled high on the shoulders, and are finished with an embroidered cuff.

Braids are very much used for trimmings, and there are several beautiful new varieties.  The Titan, is a mohair braid of neat design; and the Giant is a heavy braid that has the effect of pleating.  Threads of tinsel and bright colors are run lavishly through many of the more dressy braids.  Wool laces are very high in popularity, and they are very rich and durable trimmings.  The Angora wool-laces, trim some of the richest street costumes.  The net or piece Angora lace is used frequently as the entire front drapery.  It comes in all the desirable shades of drab, brown, gray, wine and blue.  In some of the new laces the designs are carried out in velvet and chenille, and from beneath the petals of the flowers hang pendants of cut beads.  A very effective order of lace has small rhinestones worked into the pattern, together with gold floss.

The pretty little Normandie cap and peasants’ waist, shown at Figure No. 4, are appropriate for a young girl’s fancy costume.  The waist is made of pale-blue cashmere; is trimmed with bias bands of cardinal velvet: and opens over a chemisette of fine white organdie, gathered full at the throat.  There are organdie puffs on each shoulder, slashed with cardinal velvet.  The coquettish cap is made also of blue cashmere, worked in sprays of shaded brown and cardinal leaves.  There is a tinsel border.

Contrary to rule, the street dresses for children this winter are winning the approbation of the philosopher; who, with astonishing amiability, heralds the return of a fashion that puts children into clothes that are at once comfortable and healthy.  True it is, the newest costumes for children are very happy combinations of the picturesque and the practical.  The Gretchen and the various Greenaway cuts are the styles most in favor.

To the left in the illustration given at Figure No. 5, is shown the Nitouche mantle; a very graceful street-wrap.  The deep front panels are formed of a jetted fabric very closely woven.  The remainder of…(continued in the next post)

"Greenaway cuts" refers to styles inspired by the children’s book illustrations of Kate Greenaway, whose storybook kids wore clothing inspired by the 1790’s and 1800’s.  Parents were drawn to these nostalgic images of a supposedly more innocent time, and dressed their kids in imitation with mob caps, high waisted pinafores and straw bonnets for girls and skeleton suits and smock-frocks for boys.  Being the arts and crafts-inspired company that it was at the time, Liberty of London’s line of children’s clothing featured "Greenaway cuts".

I’m not sure what “the Gretchen” refers to.

Portrait of Kunigunde of Austria by unknown master, ca 1485 Austria, Fundación Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza
There’s little naked people on her headpiece.

Portrait of Kunigunde of Austria by unknown master, ca 1485 Austria, Fundación Colección Thyssen-Bornemisza

There’s little naked people on her headpiece.

(Source: museothyssen.org)

hatsfromhistory:

vintagevision:

ragbag:

know your top hat styles*
i rock a tilbury 24/7. just sayin’.
__
*from: the whole art of dress! by “a cavalry officer” (1830).

hatsfromhistory:

vintagevision:

ragbag:

know your top hat styles*

i rock a tilbury 24/7. just sayin’.

__

*from: the whole art of dress! by “a cavalry officer” (1830).

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