Ghost
Une Tapissiere. Eine Tapesierin. (Upholsterer) by Martin Engelbrecht and Johann J Stelzer, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Une Tapissiere. Eine Tapesierin. (Upholsterer) by Martin Engelbrecht and Johann J Stelzer, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Ouvrier en Porcelaine. Ein Porcelain macher. (Porcelain maker) and Ouvriere en Porcelaine. Eine Porcelain macherin. (Porcelain maker’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

Un Cofretier. Ein Flaschner. (Tinsmith) and Une Cofretiere. Eine Flaschnerin. (Tinsmith’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

Un Peruquier. Ein Peruquenmacher. (Perukemaker) and Feme de Peruquier. Eine Peruquenmacherin. (Perukemaker’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

A perukemaker made wigs.

Here and here.

Un Tailleur. Ein Schneider. (Tailor) and Femme de Tailleur. Ein Schneiderin. (Tailor’s wife) by Martin Engelbrecht, 1700-56 (ca 1730’s?) Germany (Augsburg), Winterthur Museum

Here and here.

"Built for Speed; 1912 Model" by W E Hill, 1912 US, from the April 3, 1912 issue of Puck

"Built for Speed; 1912 Model" by W E Hill, 1912 US, from the April 3, 1912 issue of Puck

"See America First" by Gordon Ross, 1911 US, from the June 14, 1911 issue of Puck

"See America First" by Gordon Ross, 1911 US, from the June 14, 1911 issue of Puck

Feb 28, 1914 Puck cover with an illustration by Nelson Greene, 1914 US
Some people in 1914 seemed to have been under the impression that the most fashionable women would dye or would soon be dying their hair outrageous colors to match the outrageous colors of their evening gowns.  I’m not sure where this idea came from, but I’ve seen it referenced in a number of cartoons from that year.
Also, I’d love to have a framed print of this.

Feb 28, 1914 Puck cover with an illustration by Nelson Greene, 1914 US

Some people in 1914 seemed to have been under the impression that the most fashionable women would dye or would soon be dying their hair outrageous colors to match the outrageous colors of their evening gowns.  I’m not sure where this idea came from, but I’ve seen it referenced in a number of cartoons from that year.

Also, I’d love to have a framed print of this.

Music sheet cover, 1850 US
hatsfromhistory:

Street Scene by Georg Emmanuel Ortiz.  The British Museum. 
They don’t have many details about this print at the British Museum, but my guess is early 1820-1825, based on their clothing.  Ortiz was living in Leipzig in the 1820s, so I think that this is in Germany.  There are some wild pieces of headwear in this image, including the strange grey headdress on the girl in the short-sleeved spencer and the headdress of the woman directly behind her.  Also, on the far left is a soldier wearing a very unusual helmet!  I know very little about early 19th century German uniforms, so if anyone out there has more information about him, I sure would appreciate it!

hatsfromhistory:

Street Scene by Georg Emmanuel Ortiz.  The British Museum. 

They don’t have many details about this print at the British Museum, but my guess is early 1820-1825, based on their clothing.  Ortiz was living in Leipzig in the 1820s, so I think that this is in Germany.  There are some wild pieces of headwear in this image, including the strange grey headdress on the girl in the short-sleeved spencer and the headdress of the woman directly behind her.  Also, on the far left is a soldier wearing a very unusual helmet!  I know very little about early 19th century German uniforms, so if anyone out there has more information about him, I sure would appreciate it!

sydneyflapper:

Paul Poiret - always fabulous

1924

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