Ghost

Slippers of Napoleon’s Sister Found

archaeologicalnews:

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A delicate pair of slippers that had been sitting unnoticed in a Scottish university’s collection for more than a century may have actually belonged to Napoleon Bonaparte’s sister, Princess Pauline Borghese, researchers say.

The narrow silk and leather shoes, which measured just 1.5 inches (40 millimeters) across the toes and about 4 inches (10.2 centimeters) long, were marked on the sole “Pauline Rome.” They would fit a small child today, but might have been perfect for the famously petite princess who researchers say was often carried from room to room. Pauline would have been the youngest of Napoleon’s three sisters; Napoleon also had four brothers.

The tiny slippers were sitting inside a chest of clothes in the collection of the University of Aberdeen, where they attracted the attention of Louise Wilkie, a museum staff member. Wilkie said the slippers were given to the museum by Robert Wilson (1787 – 1871), who traveled the world extensively as a ship’s surgeon and had a friendship with Princess Pauline Borghese. Read more.

Mourning evening slippers by Melnotte, 1845-65 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tiny black slippers were de rigueur in the fashionable mid-Victorian lady’s wardrobe. Black shoes were felt to go with anything, hence the most versatile and dependable choice of footwear to have on hand. Slippers of this type are most commonly found in satin, so the faille fabric of this unworn pair is unusual. It is possible that the shoes were intended for mourning, when a dull-surfaced fabric was desired. The interesting label of the London vendor - written largely in French, noting the firm as exclusive agent, and mentioning the added stock of Parisian gloves, perfumes, and novelties - demonstrates the importance of imported French shoes and accessories in the contemporary market.

Mourning evening slippers by Melnotte, 1845-65 France, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tiny black slippers were de rigueur in the fashionable mid-Victorian lady’s wardrobe. Black shoes were felt to go with anything, hence the most versatile and dependable choice of footwear to have on hand. Slippers of this type are most commonly found in satin, so the faille fabric of this unworn pair is unusual. It is possible that the shoes were intended for mourning, when a dull-surfaced fabric was desired. The interesting label of the London vendor - written largely in French, noting the firm as exclusive agent, and mentioning the added stock of Parisian gloves, perfumes, and novelties - demonstrates the importance of imported French shoes and accessories in the contemporary market.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Men’s slippers, ca 1860
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Men’s slippers, ca 1860

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 2:00 PM GMT (9:00 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Dresses, 1920’s
The lot contains six dresses, evening jackets, feather boas, capelets,  two sequined boleros, lingerie, two pairs of shoes, a parasol and other items from the 1920’s-30’s.
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 10:30 AM GMT (5:30 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Dresses, 1920’s

The lot contains six dresses, evening jackets, feather boas, capelets, two sequined boleros, lingerie, two pairs of shoes, a parasol and other items from the 1920’s-30’s.

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will end October 16th at 10:30 AM GMT (5:30 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Berlin wool and beadwork shoes, ca 1845
Comes with a tartan reticule from the same era.
Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will take place October 16th at 10:30 AM GMT (5:30 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

Berlin wool and beadwork shoes, ca 1845

Comes with a tartan reticule from the same era.

Click to go to the absentee bidding page.  This Kerry Taylor auction will take place October 16th at 10:30 AM GMT (5:30 AM EST).  You will need to register to bid ahead of time.

An ad for the Up-Town shoe store, ca 1872
Sex sells

An ad for the Up-Town shoe store, ca 1872

Sex sells

Shoes, ca 1785-95 the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum
Leather with silk ruches

Shoes, ca 1785-95 the Netherlands, Rijksmuseum

Leather with silk ruches

charlestonmuseum:

While these incredible shoes were not worn by the Wicked Witch of the West, she probably would have loved them. Labeled “The Livingston Shoe,” these bronzed leather lace-up beauties came from Charleston shoe retailer, Walter Francis Livingston (1874-1946).  He opened his store at 366 King Street in 1896 and these probably date to right around then. They have long, shallow pointed toes, curvaceous Louis heels and high front lacing over a tongue lined in lamb’s wool.

Bronzing refers to a process of treating the leather with red dye, originally cochineal and by the 1890s, an aniline dye imitation, to give it a metallic semi-iridescence.

Livingston remodeled his store in 1922 and opened a second store in Jacksonville Florida. In the 1921 Boot & Shoe Recorder, he was touted as using an aeroplane to advertise “the best advertised shoe sale ever held in the South.” Livingston himself went up as a passenger in the plane to drop circulars and advertisements over the Isle of Palms on Sunday, June 25. Among the flyers was a coupon for a free pair of shoes and $1 off coupons. He was often mentioned as having attended the Boston Style Show, bringing the latest styles and patterns to Charleston direct from the largest and most representative manufacturers.

Ladies’ skirts were still long in the 1890s, so probably just these pointed toes would appear. But, some of the more active fashions (walking outfits, business wear) saw skirts rising around the ankle, so these would have been perfect.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

charlestonmuseum:

White suede shoes, 1880s. From L Perchellet / Chaussures / Brevetées / 2 Place Vendôme / Entrée: 356 r. St. Honoré / Paris, these slippers with brass beadwork were made for “Mlle Sanford.” This probably indicates the donor’s mother, Ethel Sanford (1873-1924) who was born in Brussels.

In a handbook for sojourning, shopping and studying in Paris, dated 1907, Elizabeth Otis Williams writes: “Perchellet at 2 place Vendôme is a very good house for slippers.”

Gift of Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1979

Pink silk faille shoes, late 19th century. Made by Gartrell / Rue St. Honoré No. 359 / Paris, these stylish boots are trimmed with lace and have embossed pewter buttons.

Gift of Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1980

Visit these lovely shoes in person – they are currently on exhibit in Charleston Couture!

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

charlestonmuseum:

This elegant bronzed leather Colonial dress shoe, c. 1915,  has a decorative buckle and a high flaring tongue – both of which suggest a revival of the mid 18th century style. The “buckle” is ornamented with a silk ribbon and cut steel beading. The stylish Cuban heels are a bit higher and more delicate than in previous years. There is a single eyelet lacing under the tongue.

The right shoe is marked: Walkover Boot Shop, referring to manufacture by George E. Keith, a maker of fine shoes in the Campello section of Brockton, MA, who created the “Walk-Over” shoe. He was dedicated to making shoes fit better; in business he was progressive, up-to-date and perhaps even visionary in his factories and treatment of employees.

Keith worked in his father’s boot and shoe business as a youngster, and began business on his own with William S. Green in 1874. They separated in 1880, and Keith embarked on an even larger scale, becoming the foremost shoe manufacturing shoe concern in Massachusetts and perhaps the world.  His “Walkover” shoe was known the world over, with showrooms in many of the large cities of this country as well as branch offices in London, Melbourne, Cologne, Buenos Ayres and Santiago.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Shoes by Steven Arpad, 1939 France, the Met Museum

Shoes by Steven Arpad, 1939 France, the Met Museum

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