Ghost
my great grandmother as a girl back in 1885 :)
Submitted by emzroz

my great grandmother as a girl back in 1885 :)

Submitted by emzroz

"Bunch of sweet peas" fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration No. 42.) The skirt of the rasse terre length, is made of white satin, and so is the full bodice, both entirely covered with sweet-pea stalks, tied in a bunch at the side, to form the girdle.  The flowers border the top of the bodice and constitute the sleeves, and a pretty satin hat is fashioned after the form of the flower.  Long gloves are ruffled on the arm, sweet peas figure on the fan, and black shoes and white silk stockings complete the costume.

"Bunch of sweet peas" fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration No. 42.) The skirt of the rasse terre length, is made of white satin, and so is the full bodice, both entirely covered with sweet-pea stalks, tied in a bunch at the side, to form the girdle.  The flowers border the top of the bodice and constitute the sleeves, and a pretty satin hat is fashioned after the form of the flower.  Long gloves are ruffled on the arm, sweet peas figure on the fan, and black shoes and white silk stockings complete the costume.

New Woman fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration, Fig. 29.) She wears a cloth tailor-made gown, and her bicycle is pourtrayed in front of it, together with the Sporting Times and her golf club; she carries her betting book and her latch-key at her side, her gun is slung across her shoulder, and her pretty Tam o’ Shanter is surmounted by a bicycle lamp.  She has gaiters to her patent leather shoes, and is armed at all points for conquest.

This girl CAN. NOT. BE. STOPPED!!

New Woman fancy dress, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Illustration, Fig. 29.) She wears a cloth tailor-made gown, and her bicycle is pourtrayed in front of it, together with the Sporting Times and her golf club; she carries her betting book and her latch-key at her side, her gun is slung across her shoulder, and her pretty Tam o’ Shanter is surmounted by a bicycle lamp.  She has gaiters to her patent leather shoes, and is armed at all points for conquest.

This girl CAN. NOT. BE. STOPPED!!

Edward IV period costume, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(1461-1883) The period is illustrated in Fig. 12 by a simple satin gown with revers of contrasting color, such as ruby with light pink; the head-dress of ruby velvet richly embroidered and jeweled.  A veil of lisse depending from each point and floating at the back.  The steeple-chase head-dresses were the particular feature of the day.  They are described as rolls of linen pointed like steeples, half an ell high, some having a wing at the side called butterflies; the cap was covered with lawn, which fell to the ground, and was tucked under the arm; many chains about the neck; velvet, silk, damask cloth of gold, costly furs, and striped materials, all worn.  The period was illustrated in the Health Exhibition of 1884 by a female figure taken from the King Rene Paris Library.  The skirt divided in two down the centre, with gold braid, each half subdivided into divisions of pink, or dark blue, gold or white satin, some having diagonal heraldic emblazoning in gold; gold belt round the waist where bodice ends; white chemisette with an upright plaiting at neck, and gold necklet; sleeves of pink satin, bordered with gold, tight blue ones beneath, forming a point on either side of the hand; stomacher of white satin crossed with gold; steeple head-dress in gold color, distended with wire, long veil to feet.

Edward IV period costume, 1896 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(1461-1883) The period is illustrated in Fig. 12 by a simple satin gown with revers of contrasting color, such as ruby with light pink; the head-dress of ruby velvet richly embroidered and jeweled.  A veil of lisse depending from each point and floating at the back.  The steeple-chase head-dresses were the particular feature of the day.  They are described as rolls of linen pointed like steeples, half an ell high, some having a wing at the side called butterflies; the cap was covered with lawn, which fell to the ground, and was tucked under the arm; many chains about the neck; velvet, silk, damask cloth of gold, costly furs, and striped materials, all worn.  The period was illustrated in the Health Exhibition of 1884 by a female figure taken from the King Rene Paris Library.  The skirt divided in two down the centre, with gold braid, each half subdivided into divisions of pink, or dark blue, gold or white satin, some having diagonal heraldic emblazoning in gold; gold belt round the waist where bodice ends; white chemisette with an upright plaiting at neck, and gold necklet; sleeves of pink satin, bordered with gold, tight blue ones beneath, forming a point on either side of the hand; stomacher of white satin crossed with gold; steeple head-dress in gold color, distended with wire, long veil to feet.

Witch fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Hubbard, Mother; Macbeth, and Coloured Illustration, Plate XV.) Short quilted skirt of red satin, with cats and lizards in black velvet; gold satin panier tunic; black velvet bodice laced over an old-gold crêpe bodice; small cat on right shoulder, a broom in the hand, with owl; tall pointed velvet cap; shoes with buckles.

Witch fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

(See Hubbard, Mother; Macbeth, and Coloured Illustration, Plate XV.) Short quilted skirt of red satin, with cats and lizards in black velvet; gold satin panier tunic; black velvet bodice laced over an old-gold crêpe bodice; small cat on right shoulder, a broom in the hand, with owl; tall pointed velvet cap; shoes with buckles.

Monte Carlo fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Dress, half red satin, half black velvet and lace; one shoe red, one black; short skirt fringed with coins, and trimmed with cards; pointed coronet of red satin, with aigrette of cards on shoulder; croupier’s rake carried in hand; and Rouge et Noir. (See Coloured Illustration, Plate XI.)

Monte Carlo fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Dress, half red satin, half black velvet and lace; one shoe red, one black; short skirt fringed with coins, and trimmed with cards; pointed coronet of red satin, with aigrette of cards on shoulder; croupier’s rake carried in hand; and Rouge et Noir. (See Coloured Illustration, Plate XI.)

Hornet fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Short black or brown dress of velvet or satin; boots to match; tunic pointed back and front, with gold stripes; satin bodice of black or brown with gold gauze wings; cap of velvet with eyes and antennæ of insect. (See Coloured Illustration, No. VII.)

Hornet fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Short black or brown dress of velvet or satin; boots to match; tunic pointed back and front, with gold stripes; satin bodice of black or brown with gold gauze wings; cap of velvet with eyes and antennæ of insect. (See Coloured Illustration, No. VII.)

Incroyable fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Incroyable (1789).  Short red, white, and blue skirt; blue satin coat with tails lined with red, and revers; lace ruffles; gold buttons; cravat of old lace; gendarme hat, with tricolour rosette; black shoes and buckles, blue stockings.  Old-fashioned gold-headed cane; fob, eyeglass. (Coloured Illustration, Plate VIII.) Or, striped satin skirt, red, white, and blue; gold satin tunic, looped up with red roses; handsome long-tailed coat of blue satin, lined gold, and large gold buttons, and bouquet of roses in buttonhole; high frill and jabot at throat; chapeau a la claque, trimmed gold and brocade, tricolour at side; blue silk stockings, worked in gold, and patent shoes; eyeglass, and elaborate jewellery.  Or, long-tailed coat of sky blue velvet, with large pearl buttons, and a white waistcoat of satin, embroidered with coloured flowers; a skirt of grey tulle with long tunic of soft grey silk looped up gracefully with pale blue satin ribbon; grey silk hose embroidered with coloured silk flowers; dark blue slippers, very large satin bows; powdered head tied with a queue; cocked hat, wide lace cravat; cane with gold head, quaint scissor-shaped eye-glass of the period.  This is a very favourite costume.  Sometimes the skirts are hand-painted; sometimes there are triple revers to the coat, for which plush is a good material; blue with white satin skirt, trimmed with gold, is a good mixture.

Incroyable fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

Incroyable (1789).  Short red, white, and blue skirt; blue satin coat with tails lined with red, and revers; lace ruffles; gold buttons; cravat of old lace; gendarme hat, with tricolour rosette; black shoes and buckles, blue stockings.  Old-fashioned gold-headed cane; fob, eyeglass. (Coloured Illustration, Plate VIII.) Or, striped satin skirt, red, white, and blue; gold satin tunic, looped up with red roses; handsome long-tailed coat of blue satin, lined gold, and large gold buttons, and bouquet of roses in buttonhole; high frill and jabot at throat; chapeau a la claque, trimmed gold and brocade, tricolour at side; blue silk stockings, worked in gold, and patent shoes; eyeglass, and elaborate jewellery.  Or, long-tailed coat of sky blue velvet, with large pearl buttons, and a white waistcoat of satin, embroidered with coloured flowers; a skirt of grey tulle with long tunic of soft grey silk looped up gracefully with pale blue satin ribbon; grey silk hose embroidered with coloured silk flowers; dark blue slippers, very large satin bows; powdered head tied with a queue; cocked hat, wide lace cravat; cane with gold head, quaint scissor-shaped eye-glass of the period.  This is a very favourite costume.  Sometimes the skirts are hand-painted; sometimes there are triple revers to the coat, for which plush is a good material; blue with white satin skirt, trimmed with gold, is a good mixture.

Esmeralda fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

A rich gipsy dress in yellow, black, and scarlet satin, made short, trimmed with coins and gold braid; a sash of gold tissue tied about the hips, a tambourine carried in hand; bracelets above and below elbow, united by coins; stay-bodice with coins and gold braid; gold net with sequins; ornaments, sequins.  Sometimes (as in Coloured Illustration No. V.) the skirt is red, trimmed with gold, and the bodice takes the form of a loose black jacket, with full yellow vest of soft silk.

Esmeralda fancy dress, 1887 England, Fancy Dresses Described by Ardern Holt

A rich gipsy dress in yellow, black, and scarlet satin, made short, trimmed with coins and gold braid; a sash of gold tissue tied about the hips, a tambourine carried in hand; bracelets above and below elbow, united by coins; stay-bodice with coins and gold braid; gold net with sequins; ornaments, sequins.  Sometimes (as in Coloured Illustration No. V.) the skirt is red, trimmed with gold, and the bodice takes the form of a loose black jacket, with full yellow vest of soft silk.

Lady Evelyn Cavendish, later Duchess of Devonshire (1870-1960), as a Lady at the Court of the Empress Maria Theresa [1745-65], at the Devonshire House Diamond Jubilee Ball, 1897 London

The Devonshire House Ball was one of the most splendid celebrations of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. In 1892 the 8th Duke of Devonshire married the widowed Duchess of Manchester, Louise von Alten, whom he had known for many years. The ‘Double Duchess’ was a famous hostess and Devonshire House as well as Chatsworth became the focus of entertainments on a scale that had not been seen since the 6th Duke’s time. Those invited to the Diamond Jubilee Ball came in full fancy dress. The Duchess was magnificent as the Queen Zenobia of Palmyra, with a dress to match. The Duke was, rather unexpectedly, the Emperor Charles V, and his young cousin and eventual successor Victor Cavendish was also in 16th -century dress as one of Holbein’s ‘Ambassadors’.

Lady Evelyn Cavendish, later Duchess of Devonshire (1870-1960), as a Lady at the Court of the Empress Maria Theresa [1745-65], at the Devonshire House Diamond Jubilee Ball, 1897 London

The Devonshire House Ball was one of the most splendid celebrations of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. In 1892 the 8th Duke of Devonshire married the widowed Duchess of Manchester, Louise von Alten, whom he had known for many years. The ‘Double Duchess’ was a famous hostess and Devonshire House as well as Chatsworth became the focus of entertainments on a scale that had not been seen since the 6th Duke’s time. Those invited to the Diamond Jubilee Ball came in full fancy dress. The Duchess was magnificent as the Queen Zenobia of Palmyra, with a dress to match. The Duke was, rather unexpectedly, the Emperor Charles V, and his young cousin and eventual successor Victor Cavendish was also in 16th -century dress as one of Holbein’s ‘Ambassadors’.

monsieurleprince:

John Calcott Horsley (1817 - 1903) - Showing a preference, 1860

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